Hydrogeochemical reconnaissance of arsenic cycling and possible environmental risk in hydrothermal systems of Taiwan

Maity, Jyoti Prakash and Chen, Chien-Yen and Bundschuh, Jochen and Bhattacharya, Prosun and Mukherjee, Abhijit and Chang, Young-Fo (2017) Hydrogeochemical reconnaissance of arsenic cycling and possible environmental risk in hydrothermal systems of Taiwan. Groundwater for Sustainable Development, 5. pp. 1-13.


Abstract

Hydrothermal activity creates geo-hydro-chemical interactions between hot water/fluid and the host rocks, which changes the hydro-chemical composition of the geothermal water/fluid and enriches trace elements. Existence of arsenic (As) is reported from different hydrothermal systems as well as several region in groundwater system at elevated concentration globally, compared to 10 μg/L WHO (World health Organization) guideline. The distribution of dissolved major and minor elements, including arsenic (As) was studied in hydrothermal systems of Taiwan. For the first time in Taiwan As(V) and As(III) species were researched from the three principal geological settings of Taiwan. Aim was to understand the cycling, fate and transport and potential impact of As on the surficial hydrological systems. Water samples were collected from sixteen hydrothermal springs of 3 different geological settings. Three groups of hydrothermal spring water samples could be distinguished: (i) strongly acidic (pH<3), sulfate-enriched waters of H-SO4-type (Yangmingshan, and Taipu, Beitou), (ii) slightly alkaline waters (pH: 8–8.95) (Jiben, Antung and Kung-Tzu-Ling), and (iii) circum-neutral waters (pH 6.47–7.41) of Na-HCO3/Na-Cl-HCO3-type (Wulai, Hongye, Rueisuei, Chung-Lun and Biolai). The waters are enriched with alkali and alkali earth metals compared to drinking water. Similarly, the water of most of the geothermal springs were found to be enriched with As (highest concentration at Beitou: 1.456 mg/L) with As(III) being the principal As species. Arsenic concentrations of hydrothermal spring waters in igneous rock terrains exhibit highest concentrations (0.69±0.71 mg/L) followed by those of sedimentary (0.16±0.14 mg/L) and metamorphic (0.06±0.02 mg/L) terrains. The discharged geothermal springs water contaminate the surface and groundwater (including drinking and irrigation water resources), where significant levels of arsenic and other toxic element have detected and hence being a significant risk for human health and environmental.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 50531
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying (1 Jul 2013 - 31 Dec 2021)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - International Centre for Applied Climate Sciences (ICACS) (1 Jan 2014 - 31 Jul 2018)
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2022 23:08
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2022 03:46
Uncontrolled Keywords: Arsenic, Trace element, Hydrochemistry, Hydrothermal spring
Fields of Research (2008): 05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050204 Environmental Impact Assessment
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050205 Environmental Management
05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050206 Environmental Monitoring
Fields of Research (2020): 41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4104 Environmental management > 410404 Environmental management
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4299 Other health sciences > 429999 Other health sciences not elsewhere classified
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4104 Environmental management > 410402 Environmental assessment and monitoring
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gsd.2017.03.001
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/50531

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only