Psychological Stress Management and Stress Reduction Strategies for Stroke Survivors: A Scoping Review

Hinwood, Madeleine and Ilicic, Marina and Gyawali, Prajwal ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0975-5576 and Coupland, Kirsten and Kluge, Murielle G. and Smith, Angela and Bowden, Sue and Nilsson, Michael and Walker, Frederick Rohan (2022) Psychological Stress Management and Stress Reduction Strategies for Stroke Survivors: A Scoping Review. Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

[img]
Preview
Text (Published - ArticleFirst Version)
Psychological Stress Management and Stress Reduction Strategies for Stroke Survivors.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Stroke can be a life-changing event, with survivors frequently experiencing some level of disability, reduced independence, and an abrupt lifestyle change. Not surprisingly, many stroke survivors report elevated levels of stress during the recovery process, which has been associated with worse outcomes. Purpose: Given the multiple roles of stress in the etiology of stroke recovery outcomes, we aimed to scope the existing literature on stress management interventions that have been trialed in stroke survivors. Methods: We performed a database search for intervention studies conducted in stroke survivors which reported the effects on stress, resilience, or coping outcome. Medline (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), Cochrane Library, and PsycInfo (OVID) were searched from database inception until March 11, 2019, and updated on September 1, 2020. Results: Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. There was significant variation in the range of trialed interventions, as well as the outcome measures used to assess stress. Overall, just over half (13/24) of the included studies reported a benefit in terms of stress reduction. Acceptability and feasibility were considered in 71% (17/24) and costs were considered in 17% (4/24) of studies. The management of stress was rarely linked to the prevention of symptoms of stress-related disorders. The overall evidence base of included studies is weak. However, an increase in the number of studies over time suggests a growing interest in this subject. Conclusions: Further research is required to identify optimum stress management interventions in stroke survivors, including whether the management of stress can ameliorate the negative impacts of stress on health.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 49991
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Medical Sciences (1 Jan 2022 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Medical Sciences (1 Jan 2022 -)
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2022 06:44
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2022 06:44
Uncontrolled Keywords: Stroke, Stress, Resilience, Stress intervention, Stress management, Depression
Fields of Research (2020): 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3209 Neurosciences > 320905 Neurology and neuromuscular diseases
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4201 Allied health and rehabilitation science > 420109 Rehabilitation
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5205 Social and personality psychology > 520503 Personality and individual differences
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200105 Treatment of human diseases and conditions
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/abm/kaac002
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/49991

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only