Physical activity and sedentary behaviour of female adolescents in Indonesia: A multi-method study on duration, pattern and context

Andriyani, Fitria Dwi and Biddle, Stuart ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Priambadha, Aprida Agung and Thomas, George and De Cocker, Katrien (2022) Physical activity and sedentary behaviour of female adolescents in Indonesia: A multi-method study on duration, pattern and context. Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness, 20 (2). pp. 128-139. ISSN 1728-869X

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Abstract

Background/Objective: Exploring comprehensive information on the duration, pattern and context of physical activity and sedentary behaviour is important to develop effective policies and interventions. Especially in lower- and middle-income countries, our understanding of these health-behaviours is limited. Our study aimed to investigate physical activity and sedentary behaviour of female Indonesian adolescents by using a multi-method approach. Methods: Female adolescents (n = 5; 13–15 years old) from Yogyakarta, Indonesia wore accelerometers and automated wearable cameras for four days, and completed diaries, and interviews between February and March 2020. Results: Participants’ activity, especially on non-school days, was dominated by light-intensity physical activity. Four of the 5 participants did not meet the physical activity guidelines. Participants spent a great proportion of time on screen-based sedentary behaviour (school days: 83.2% of wear time; non-school days: 75.7% of wear time). During school days, most physical activity and sedentary behaviour was done at school. Screen time was mainly done on the school day evenings and weekend mornings. Participants mostly used smartphones in the bedroom and living room in a solitary environment. Interviews suggest that the high amount of screen time seemed to be influenced by a lack of awareness of current guidelines, the feeling of urgency to check information, and the lack of parental supervision. Non-screen-based sedentary behaviour comprised just over 10% of total camera images. Conclusion: The use of a multi-method approach facilitated a rich understanding of the duration, patterns, and contexts of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in participants. Future studies might consider using similar methods in a larger sample.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2022 03:28
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2022 02:30
Uncontrolled Keywords: LMIC, Non-screen-based sedentary behaviour, Screen time, Wearable camera, Youth
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4299 Other health sciences > 429999 Other health sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2099 Other health > 209999 Other health not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesf.2022.02.002
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/49644

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