TESS Asteroseismology of α Mensae: Benchmark Ages for a G7 Dwarf and Its M Dwarf Companion

Chontos, Ashley and Huber, Daniel and Berger, Travis A. and Kjeldsen, Hans and Serenelli, Aldo M. and Aguirre, Victor Silva and Ball, Warrick H. and Basu, Sarbani and Bedding, Timothy R. and Chaplin, William J. and Claytor, Zachary R. and Corsaro, Enrico and Garcia, Rafael A. and Howell, Steve B. and Lundkvist, Mia S. and Mathur, Savita and Metcalfe, Travis S. and Nielsen, Martin B. and Ong, Jia Mian Joel and Orhan, Zeynep Celik and Ortel, Sibel and Salama, Maissa and Stassun, Keivan G. and Townsend, R. H. D. and van Saders, Jennifer L. and Winther, Mark and Yildiz, Mutlu and Butler, R. Paul and Tinney, C. G. and Wittenmyer, Robert A. (2021) TESS Asteroseismology of α Mensae: Benchmark Ages for a G7 Dwarf and Its M Dwarf Companion. The Astrophysical Journal, 922 (2):229. pp. 1-15. ISSN 0004-637X


Abstract

Asteroseismology of bright stars has become increasingly important as a method to determine the fundamental properties (in particular ages) of stars. The Kepler Space Telescope initiated a revolution by detecting oscillations in more than 500 main-sequence and subgiant stars. However, most Kepler stars are faint and therefore have limited constraints from independent methods such as long-baseline interferometry. Here we present the discovery of solar-like oscillations in α Men A, a naked-eye (V = 5.1) G7 dwarf in TESS's southern continuous viewing zone. Using a combination of astrometry, spectroscopy, and asteroseismology, we precisely characterize the solar analog α Men A (T eff = 5569 62 K, R ∗ = 0.960 0.016 R o˙, M ∗ = 0.964 0.045 M o˙). To characterize the fully convective M dwarf companion, we derive empirical relations to estimate mass, radius, and temperature given the absolute Gaia magnitude and metallicity, yielding M ∗ = 0.169 0.006 M o˙, R ∗ = 0.19 0.01 R o˙, and T eff = 3054 44 K. Our asteroseismic age of 6.2 1.4 (stat) 0.6 (sys) Gyr for the primary places α Men B within a small population of M dwarfs with precisely measured ages. We combined multiple ground-based spectroscopy surveys to reveal an activity cycle of P = 13.1 1.1 yr for α Men A, a period similar to that observed in the Sun. We used different gyrochronology models with the asteroseismic age to estimate a rotation period of ∼30 days for the primary. Alpha Men A is now the closest (d = 10 pc) solar analog with a precise asteroseismic age from space-based photometry, making it a prime target for next-generation direct-imaging missions searching for true Earth analogs.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2022 05:36
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2022 02:21
Uncontrolled Keywords: Asteroseismology (73); Stellar physics (1621); Stellar properties (1624); Stellar ages (1581); Solar oscillations (1515); Photometry (1234); Low mass stars (2050); Solar analogs (1941); Stellar activity (1580); Fundamental parameters of stars (555); M dwarf stars (982); Astrometry (80); Astrophysics - Solar and Stellar Astrophysics; Astrophysics - Earth and Planetary Astrophysics
Fields of Research (2020): 51 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 5101 Astronomical sciences > 510109 Stellar astronomy and planetary systems
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280120 Expanding knowledge in the physical sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/ac1269
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/49484

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