Delineating Groundwater Recharge Potential through Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

Maqsoom, Ahsen and Aslam, Bilal and Khalid, Nauman and Ullah, Fahim ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6221-1175 and Anysz, Hubert and Almaliki, Abdulrazak H. and Almaliki, Abdulrhman A. and Hussein, Enas E. (2022) Delineating Groundwater Recharge Potential through Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems. Water, 14 (11):1824. pp. 1-29.

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Abstract

Owing to the extensive global dependency on groundwater and associated increasing water demand, the global groundwater level is declining rapidly. In the case of Islamabad, Pakistan, the groundwater level has lowered five times over the past five years due to extensive pumping by various departments and residents to meet the local water requirements. To address this, water reservoirs and sources need to be delineated, and potential recharge zones are highlighted to assess the recharge potential. Therefore, the current study utilizes an integrated approach based on remote sensing (RS) and GIS using the influence factor (IF) technique to delineate potential groundwater recharge zones in Islamabad, Pakistan. Soil map of Pakistan, Landsat 8TM satellite data, digital elevation model (ASTER DEM), and local geological map were used in the study for the preparation of thematic maps of 15 key contributing factors considered in this study. To generate a combined groundwater recharge map, rate and weightage values were assigned to each factor representing their mutual influence and recharge capabilities. To analyze the final combined recharge map, five different assessment analogies were used in the study: poor, low, medium, high, and best. The final recharge potential map for Islamabad classifies 15% (136.8 km2) of the region as the “best” zone for extracting groundwater. Furthermore, high, medium, low, and poor ranks were assigned to 21%, 24%, 27%, and 13% of the region with respective areas of 191.52 km2, 218.88 km2, 246.24 km2, and 118.56 km2. Overall, this research outlines the best to least favorable zones in Islamabad regarding groundwater recharge potentials. This can help the authorities devise mitigation strategies and preserve the natural terrain in the regions with the best groundwater recharge potential. This is aligned with the aims of the interior ministry of Pakistan for constructing small reservoirs and ponds in the existing natural streams and installing recharging wells to maintain the groundwater level in cities. Other countries can expand upon and adapt this study to delineate local groundwater recharge potentials.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Surveying and Built Environment (1 Jan 2022 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Surveying and Built Environment (1 Jan 2022 -)
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2022 02:52
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2022 02:52
Uncontrolled Keywords: geographical information systems; groundwater assessment; groundwater recharge; remote sensing; Islamabad
Fields of Research (2020): 33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3399 Other built environment and design > 339999 Other built environment and design not elsewhere classified
40 ENGINEERING > 4005 Civil engineering > 400513 Water resources engineering
44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4406 Human geography > 440612 Urban geography
37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3709 Physical geography and environmental geoscience > 370901 Geomorphology and earth surface processes
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3304 Urban and regional planning > 330404 Land use and environmental planning
37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3707 Hydrology > 370704 Surface water hydrology
37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3704 Geoinformatics > 370499 Geoinformatics not elsewhere classified
40 ENGINEERING > 4004 Chemical engineering > 400411 Water treatment processes
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4105 Pollution and contamination > 410504 Surface water quality processes and contaminated sediment assessment
37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3705 Geology > 370508 Resource geoscience
37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3707 Hydrology > 370703 Groundwater hydrology
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3304 Urban and regional planning > 330413 Urban planning and health
37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3707 Hydrology > 370705 Urban hydrology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 12 CONSTRUCTION > 1206 Environmentally sustainable construction activities > 120604 Management of water consumption by construction activities
18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1803 Fresh, ground and surface water systems and management > 180307 Rehabilitation or conservation of fresh, ground and surface water environments
19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1902 Environmental policy, legislation and standards > 190211 Water policy (incl. water allocation)
22 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION SERVICES > 2202 Environmentally sustainable information and communication services > 220202 Management of water consumption by information and communication services
11 COMMERCIAL SERVICES AND TOURISM > 1105 Water and waste services > 110504 Water services and utilities
18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1803 Fresh, ground and surface water systems and management > 180305 Ground water quantification, allocation and impact of depletion
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111824
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/48737

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