Can additional N fertiliser ameliorate the elevated CO2-induced depression in grain and tissue N concentrations of wheat on a high soil N background?

Tausz, M. and Norton, R. M. and Tausz-Posch, S. and Low, M. and Seneweera, S. and O'Leary, G. and Armstrong, R. and Fitzgerald, G. J. (2017) Can additional N fertiliser ameliorate the elevated CO2-induced depression in grain and tissue N concentrations of wheat on a high soil N background? Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science, 203 (6). pp. 574-583. ISSN 0931-2250

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Abstract

Elevated CO2 stimulates crop yields but leads to lower tissue and grain nitrogen concentrations [N], raising concerns about grain quality in cereals. To test whether N fertiliser application above optimum growth requirements can alleviate the decline in tissue [N], wheat was grown in a Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility in a low-rainfall cropping system on high soil N. Crops were grown with and without addition of 50–60 kg N/ha in 12 growing environments created by supplemental irrigation and two sowing dates over 3 years. Elevated CO2 increased yield and biomass (on average by 25%) and decreased biomass [N] (3%–9%) and grain [N] (5%). Nitrogen uptake was greater (20%) in crops grown under elevated CO2. Additional N supply had no effect on yield and biomass, confirming high soil N. Small increases in [N] with N addition were insufficient to offset declines in grain [N] under elevated CO2. Instead, N application increased the [N] in straw and decreased N harvest index. The results suggest that conventional addition of N does not mitigate grain [N] depression under elevated CO2, and lend support to hypotheses that link decreases in crop [N] with biochemical limitations rather than N supply.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: File reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/author.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2022 23:45
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2022 03:24
Uncontrolled Keywords: climate change, crop nutrition, dryland agriculture, grain protein, nitrogen fertiliser
Fields of Research (2008): 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070306 Crop and Pasture Nutrition
05 Environmental Sciences > 0503 Soil Sciences > 050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070302 Agronomy
Fields of Research (2020): 41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4106 Soil sciences > 410604 Soil chemistry and soil carbon sequestration (excl. carbon sequestration science)
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300403 Agronomy
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300407 Crop and pasture nutrition
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jac.12209
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/48699

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