Navigating intimate trans citizenship while incarcerated in Australia and the United States

Bromdal, Annette ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1307-1794 and Halliwell, Sherree and Sanders, Tait and Clark, Kirsty A. and Gildersleeve, Jessica ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7694-5615 and Mullens, Amy B. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0939-9842 and Phillips, Tania M. and Debattista, Joseph and du Plessis, Carol and Daken, Kirstie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3631-600X and Hughto, Jaclyn (2022) Navigating intimate trans citizenship while incarcerated in Australia and the United States. Feminism & Psychology. pp. 1-23. ISSN 0959-3535

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Abstract

Trans women incarcerated throughout the world have been described as 'vulnerable populations' due to significant victimization, mistreatment, lack of gender-affirming care, and human rights violations, which confers greater risk of trauma, self-harm, and suicide compared with the general incarcerated population. Most incarceration settings around the world are segregated by the person’s sex characteristics (i.e., male or female) and governed by strong cis and gender normative paradigms. This analysis seeks to better understand and appreciate how the 'instructions' and the 'authorities' that regulate trans women’s corporeal representation, housing options and sense of self-determination implicate and affect their agency and actions in handling intimacies related to their personal life. Drawing upon lived incarcerated experiences of 24 trans women in Australia and the United States, and employing Ken Plummer’s notion of intimate citizenship, this analysis explores how trans women navigate choices and ways 'to do' gender, identities, bodies, emotions, desires and relationships while incarcerated in men’s prisons and governed by cis and gender normative paradigms. This critical analysis contributes to understanding how incarcerated trans women through grit, resilience, and ingenuity still navigate ways to embody, express and enact their intimate citizenship in innovative and unique ways.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: File reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/author.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 27 May 2022 00:24
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2022 01:50
Uncontrolled Keywords: trans women, incarceration, intimate citizenship, agency, Australia, United States
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420602 Health equity
44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4402 Criminology > 440202 Correctional theory, offender treatment and rehabilitation
44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4405 Gender studies > 440508 Transgender studies
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 23 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 2301 Community services > 230108 Gender and sexualities
23 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 2304 Justice and the law > 230408 Rehabilitation and correctional services
20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200204 Health inequalities
Funding Details:
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/09593535221102224
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/48639

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