The Use of Percutaneous Thermal Sensing Microchips to Measure Body Temperature in Horses during and after Exercise Using Three Different Cool-Down Methods

Kang, Hyungsuk and Zsoldos, Rebeka R. and Skinner, Jazmine E. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0270-0740 and Gaughan, John B. and Mellor, Vincent A. and Sole-Guitart, Albert (2022) The Use of Percutaneous Thermal Sensing Microchips to Measure Body Temperature in Horses during and after Exercise Using Three Different Cool-Down Methods. Animals, 12 (10):1267. pp. 1-20.

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Abstract

The frequent monitoring of a horse’s body temperature post strenuous exercise is critical to prevent or alleviate exertional heat illness (EHI) from occurring. Percutaneous thermal sensing microchip (PTSM) technology has the potential to be used as a means of monitoring a horse’s body temperature during and post-exercise. However, the accuracy of the temperature readings obtained, and their relationship to core body temperature are dependent on where they are implanted. This study aimed to document the relationship between core body temperature, and temperature readings obtained using PTSM implanted in different muscles, during exercise and post application of different cool-down methods. PTSMs were implanted into the right pectoral, right gluteal, right splenius muscles, and nuchal ligament. The temperatures were monitored during treadmill exercise, and post application of three different cool-down methods: no water application (Wno), water application only (Wonly), and water application following scraping (Wscraping). Central venous temperature (TCV) and PTSM temperatures from each region were obtained to investigate the optimal body site for microchip implantation. In this study, PTSM technology provided a practical, safe, and quick means of measuring body temperature in horses. However, its temperature readings varied depending on the implantation site. All muscle temperature readings exhibited strong relationships with TCV (r = 0.85~0.92, p < 0.05) after treadmill exercise without human intervention (water application), while the nuchal ligament temperature showed poor relationship with TCV. The relationships between TCV and PTSM temperatures became weaker with water application. Overall, however the pectoral muscle temperature measured by PTSM technology had the most constant relationships with TCV and showed the best potential to act as an alternate means of monitoring body temperature in horses for 50 min post-exercise, when there was no human intervention with cold water application.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agriculture and Environmental Science (1 Jan 2022 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agriculture and Environmental Science (1 Jan 2022 -)
Date Deposited: 16 May 2022 23:07
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2022 02:29
Uncontrolled Keywords: horse; percutaneous thermal sensing microchip; body temperature; cool-down method; central venous temperature
Fields of Research (2020): 30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3009 Veterinary sciences > 300902 Veterinary anatomy and physiology
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3003 Animal production > 300307 Environmental studies in animal production
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3003 Animal production > 300306 Animal welfare
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 10 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 1004 Livestock raising > 100406 Horses
28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280101 Expanding knowledge in the agricultural, food and veterinary sciences
10 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 1099 Other animal production and animal primary products > 109902 Animal welfare
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12101267
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/48481

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