More than motor impairment: A spatiotemporal analysis of cognitive impairment and associated neuropathological changes following cortical photothrombotic stroke

Sanchez-Bezanilla, Sonia and Hood, Rebecca J. and Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E. and Turner, Renee J. and Walker, Frederick R. and Nilsson, Michael and Ong, Lin Kooi ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8664-0540 (2021) More than motor impairment: A spatiotemporal analysis of cognitive impairment and associated neuropathological changes following cortical photothrombotic stroke. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 41 (9). pp. 2439-2455. ISSN 0271-678X


Abstract

There is emerging evidence suggesting that a cortical stroke can cause delayed and remote hippocampal dysregulation, leading to cognitive impairment. In this study, we aimed to investigate motor and cognitive outcomes after experimental stroke, and their association with secondary neurodegenerative processes. Specifically, we used a photothrombotic stroke model targeting the motor and somatosensory cortices of mice. Motor function was assessed using the cylinder and grid walk tasks. Changes in cognition were assessed using a mouse touchscreen platform. Neuronal loss, gliosis and amyloid-β accumulation were investigated in the peri-infarct and ipsilateral hippocampal regions at 7, 28 and 84 days post-stroke. Our findings showed persistent impairment in cognitive function post-stroke, whilst there was a modest spontaneous motor recovery over the investigated period of 84 days. In the peri-infarct region, we detected a reduction in neuronal loss and decreased neuroinflammation over time post-stroke, which potentially explains the spontaneous motor recovery. Conversely, we observed persistent neuronal loss together with concomitant increased neuroinflammation and amyloid-β accumulation in the hippocampus, which likely accounts for the persistent cognitive dysfunction. Our findings indicate that cortical stroke induces secondary neurodegenerative processes in the hippocampus, a region remote from the primary infarct, potentially contributing to the progression of post-stroke cognitive impairment.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 09 Jun 2022 23:39
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2022 01:33
Uncontrolled Keywords: amyloid-β; Cognitive impairment; neuroinflammation; secondary neurodegeneration; stroke
Fields of Research (2020): 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3209 Neurosciences > 320905 Neurology and neuromuscular diseases
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3209 Neurosciences > 320902 Cellular nervous system
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5204 Cognitive and computational psychology > 520401 Cognition
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200104 Prevention of human diseases and conditions
20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200101 Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions
20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200105 Treatment of human diseases and conditions
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X211005877
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/48229

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