The gender-apartheid analogy in the transnational feminist imaginary: Ms. Magazine and the Feminist Majority Foundation, 1972-2002

Stevenson, Ana ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4858-1073 (2018) The gender-apartheid analogy in the transnational feminist imaginary: Ms. Magazine and the Feminist Majority Foundation, 1972-2002. Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies, 19 (1). pp. 93-116. ISSN 1753-3171


Abstract

This article considers the rhetorical implications of transnational exchange between feminist activists in the late twentieth century. It uses Gloria Steinem’s Ms. Magazine (est. 1972) and the Feminist Majority Foundation (FMF) as a lens through which to understand the emergence of the gender-apartheid analogy in the 1990s. During the 1970s and 1980s, Ms. demonstrated knowledge of and commitment to the anti-apartheid movement. However, when the FMF and Ms. began using apartheid as an analogy for gender-based oppression in the Middle East after the fall of the apartheid regime, the limitations of transnational understanding became fundamentally apparent. This article traces the historical and rhetorical foundations for the use of race-based analogies in women’s rights activism. It then examines the journalistic and foreign policy perspectives espoused toward the South African apartheid regime and women’s rights abuses under fundamentalist Islamic regimes. At the turn of the twenty-first century, this article argues, the transnational feminist imaginary was shaped by a process of inspiration and appropriation which delimited solidarity and understanding across transnational networks of feminist activists.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2022 23:33
Last Modified: 30 May 2022 03:23
Uncontrolled Keywords: United States; South Africa; apartheid; gender; race; Islamic fundamentalism
Fields of Research (2020): 43 HISTORY, HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 4303 Historical studies > 430321 North American history
43 HISTORY, HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 4303 Historical studies > 430309 Gender history
43 HISTORY, HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 4303 Historical studies > 430322 Sub-Saharan African history
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 13 CULTURE AND SOCIETY > 1307 Understanding past societies > 130706 Understanding the past of the Americas
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/17533171.2018.1404752
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/47183

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