Transfer of key language features from L1 English academic persuasive essay to L1 Arabic academic persuasive essays by Arabic EFL learners

Alsaghier, Abdalrhman (2020) Transfer of key language features from L1 English academic persuasive essay to L1 Arabic academic persuasive essays by Arabic EFL learners. [Thesis (PhD/Research)]

[img]
Preview
Text (Whole Thesis)
Thesis .pdf

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Transfer between languages is generally accepted as being predominantly a positive phenomenon. Less is known, however, of the effects of transfer on the quality of writing in English and in Arabic and the reverse transfer in writing from English to Arabic for bilingual higher education students. This study reports a contrastive analysis of Arabic scripts and English scripts on nine features of writing proficiency, of an unrehearsed persuasive essay writing task undertaken by 40 bilingual Arabic L1/English L2 fourth-year undergraduate students aged 20-24. This genre was selected because of its relevance to academic writing skills that the students were seeking to acquire. The marking criteria were adopted from the Australian National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) test. The findings of a positive cognitive impact on students’ persuasive writing after receiving English-medium higher education in an Arabic university, were supported by reflective survey responses. A stimulated-recall methodology by interview prompted participants to deconstruct the purpose of specified features of writing. The results were revealed in a detailed analysis of the individual scripts, by additional comparison with monolingual Arabic writers. Positive transfer of key language features from English L2 to Arabic L1 writing was evident for audience, ideas, persuasion, devices, cohesion and paragraphing.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 47037
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Thesis (PhD/Research)
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Supervisors: O'Neill, Shirley; Dashwood, Ann; Dann, Christopher
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2022 02:00
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2022 02:00
Uncontrolled Keywords: reverse transfer, language features, TESOL, bilingual Arabic, L1-English, L2 students, interdependence hypothesis, threshold hypothesis, EFL
Fields of Research (2008): 20 Language, Communication and Culture > 2004 Linguistics > 200401 Applied Linguistics and Educational Linguistics
Fields of Research (2020): 47 LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE > 4704 Linguistics > 470401 Applied linguistics and educational linguistics
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/47037

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only