Deconstructing the concept of shared responsibility for disaster resilience: a Sunshine Coast case study, Australia

Singh-Peterson, Lila ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6095-9569 and Salmon, Paul and Baldwin, Claudia and Goode, Natassia (2015) Deconstructing the concept of shared responsibility for disaster resilience: a Sunshine Coast case study, Australia. Natural Hazards, 79 (2). pp. 755-774. ISSN 0921-030X


Abstract

Due in part to the increase in frequency and intensity of extreme weather events in Australia, emergency management has recently transitioned from a command-and-control civil defence structure to one promoting 'shared responsibility' between government, businesses, non-government, communities and individuals. The objective is to enable communities to become disaster resilient as opposed to fortified against risk. In this paper, using a case study approach, we examine whether this national resilience approach has been effectively institutionalised at the local scale. To do this, we draw upon the knowledge of those working within the traditional emergency management and community service sectors to identify which factors influence the resilience of a community in the case study location and determine which stakeholder classes are considered responsible for developing and enhancing each factor. The results indicate that all three tiers of government are still seen to be largely responsible for the case study's disaster resilience; however, local community groups comprised of volunteers are also perceived to be largely responsible for disaster resilience despite obvious capacity and resourcing limitations.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2022 05:12
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2022 05:12
Uncontrolled Keywords: Community Resilience; Climate-Change; Base Line; Management; Vulnerability; Adaptation; Responders; Thinking; Lessons
Fields of Research (2008): 05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
16 Studies in Human Society > 1605 Policy and Administration > 160511 Research, Science and Technology Policy
Fields of Research (2020): 41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4101 Climate change impacts and adaptation > 410103 Human impacts of climate change and human adaptation
44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4407 Policy and administration > 440704 Environment policy
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4101 Climate change impacts and adaptation > 410199 Climate change impacts and adaptation not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): D Environment > 96 Environment > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960307 Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts)
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960311 Social Impacts of Climate Change and Variability
C Society > 94 Law, Politics and Community Services > 9402 Government and Politics > 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1902 Environmental policy, legislation and standards > 190299 Environmental policy, legislation and standards not elsewhere classified
19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1901 Adaptation to climate change > 190199 Adaptation to climate change not elsewhere classified
19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1901 Adaptation to climate change > 190103 Social impacts of climate change and variability
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-015-1871-y
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/46809

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