Teachers’ experiences of teaching the Australian Health and Physical Education Health Benefits of Physical Activity curriculum and the need for greater reality congruence

Williams, John and Davies, Michael J. and SueSee, Brendan and Hunt, Dylan (2021) Teachers’ experiences of teaching the Australian Health and Physical Education Health Benefits of Physical Activity curriculum and the need for greater reality congruence. Curriculum Perspectives. pp. 1-11. ISSN 0159-7868


Abstract

The paper’s purpose was to understand how Australian Capital Territory primary school Year 5/6 teachers deliver the Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education (AC: HPE) (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2016) Health Benefits of Physical Activity (HBPA) Focus Area. Our research questions were as follows: (1) ‘How do ACT Year 5/6 primary teachers understand the AC: HPE HBPA Focus Area?’ and (2) ‘What enablers and constraints exist for teaching this Focus Area?’ A qualitative approach was adopted with 15 participants who were specialists or generalist teachers of Physical Education/Health and Physical Education (HPE). Data were collected using three semi-structured group interviews which were recorded and transcribed. The resulting transcripts were interpreted using figurational sociology and the relevant literature. Participants were found to understand and teach HBPA in limited ways through privileging fitness, fitness testing and considering the students as individuals who were predominantly responsible for their own physical health. In contrast, the HBPA Focus Area requires teachers to connect with community social and emotional health and well-being and acknowledge individual physical health is influenced by others, as well as broader societal issues. Participant passion for teaching physical activity was identified as a possible enabler for teaching HBPA. However, participant capacity for teaching this Focus Area was affected by historical ways of teaching and a range of imposed constraints. Traditional teaching and constraints characterised by social power relationships that included the participants and educational management, if addressed, could lead to HBPA being taught in what we describe as more reality-congruent ways.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2022 00:14
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2022 02:06
Uncontrolled Keywords: Australian curriculum; Figurational sociology; Health benefits of physical activity; Physical education
Fields of Research (2008): 13 Education > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130210 Physical Education and Development Curriculum and Pedagogy
13 Education > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Fields of Research (2020): 39 EDUCATION > 3901 Curriculum and pedagogy > 390111 Physical education and development curriculum and pedagogy
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 93 Education and Training > 9303 Curriculum > 930302 Syllabus and Curriculum Development
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 16 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 1603 Teaching and curriculum > 160301 Assessment, development and evaluation of curriculum
16 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 1603 Teaching and curriculum > 160302 Pedagogy
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s41297-021-00154-4
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/45410

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