Assessing Rainwater Harvesting Potential in Urban Areas: A Building Information Modelling (BIM) Approach

Maqsoom, Ahsen and Aslam, Bilal and Ismail, Sharjeel and Thaheem, Muhammad Jamaluddin and Ullah, Fahim ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6221-1175 and Zahoor, Hafiz and Musarat, Muhammad Ali and Vatin, Nikolai Ivanovich (2021) Assessing Rainwater Harvesting Potential in Urban Areas: A Building Information Modelling (BIM) Approach. Sustainability, 13 (22):12583. pp. 1-21.

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Abstract

Water scarcity has become a major problem for many countries, resulting in declining water supply and creating a need to find alternative solutions. One potential solution is rainwater harvesting (RwH), which allows rainwater to be stored for human needs. This study develops an RwH assessment system through building information modeling (BIM). For this purpose, a hydrological study of Cfa-type climate cities is conducted with the example of Islamabad, Pakistan. The monthly rainfall data of three sites were assessed to determine the volume of the accumulated rainwater and its potential to meet human needs. The average number of people living in a house is taken as the household number. Household number or of the number of employees working at a small enterprise, roofing material, and rooftop area are used as the key parameters for pertinent assessment in the BIM. The data simulated by BIM highlight the RwH potential using five people per house as the occupancy and a 90 m2rooftop area for residential buildings or small enterprises as parameters. The results show that the selected sites can collect as much as 8,190 L/yr of rainwater(48 L/person/day) to 103,300 L/yr of rainwater (56 L/person/day). This much water is enough to fulfill the daily demands of up to five people. Therefore, it is established that the study area has an RwH potential that is able to meet the expected demands. This study presents a baseline approach for RwH to address water scarcity issues for residential buildings and factories of the future.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 4.0/).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying (1 Jul 2013 - 31 Dec 2021)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying (1 Jul 2013 - 31 Dec 2021)
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2021 01:40
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2021 04:06
Uncontrolled Keywords: rainwater harvesting (RwH); water demand; building information modeling (BIM);hydrological investigation; sustainable drainage systems (SuDs); residential buildings
Fields of Research (2008): 12 Built Environment and Design > 1202 Building > 120202 Building Science and Techniques
12 Built Environment and Design > 1205 Urban and Regional Planning > 120507 Urban Analysis and Development
12 Built Environment and Design > 1202 Building > 120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning
09 Engineering > 0905 Civil Engineering > 090509 Water Resources Engineering
Fields of Research (2020): 33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3302 Building > 330202 Building construction management and project planning
40 ENGINEERING > 4005 Civil engineering > 400513 Water resources engineering
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3302 Building > 330204 Building information modelling and management
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3304 Urban and regional planning > 330413 Urban planning and health
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3302 Building > 330201 Automation and technology in building and construction
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3302 Building > 330206 Building science, technologies and systems
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/su132212583
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/44932

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