To Couple or not to Couple? For Acute:Chronic Workload Ratios and Injury Risk, Does it Really Matter?

Gabbett, Tim J. and Hulin, Billy and Blanch, Peter and Chapman, Paul and Bailey, David (2019) To Couple or not to Couple? For Acute:Chronic Workload Ratios and Injury Risk, Does it Really Matter? International Journal of Sports Medicine, 40 (9). pp. 597-600. ISSN 0172-4622


Abstract

We examined the association between coupled and uncoupled acute:chronic workload ratios (ACWR) and injury risk in a cohort of 28 elite cricket fast bowlers (mean±SD age, 26±5 yr). Workloads were estimated using the session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE). Coupled ACWRs were calculated using a 1-week acute workload and 4-week chronic workload (acute workload was included in the chronic workload calculation), whereas uncoupled ACWRs used the most recent 1-week acute workload and the prior 3-week chronic workload (acute workload was not included in the chronic workload calculation). A nearly perfect relationship (R 2 =0.99) was found between coupled and uncoupled ACWRs. Using a percentile rank method, no significant differences in injury risk were found between the coupled and uncoupled ACWR. Higher ACWRs were associated with increased injury likelihood for both coupled and uncoupled methods, however there were no significant differences in injury risk between coupled and uncoupled ACWRs. Our data demonstrates that both coupled and uncoupled ACWRs produce the same injury likelihoods. Furthermore, our results are consistent with previous studies: higher ACWRs are associated with greater risk, irrespective of whether acute and chronic workloads are coupled or uncoupled.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2021 03:14
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2021 04:03
Uncontrolled Keywords: Adult; Athletic Injuries; Humans; Physical Exertion; Risk Factors; Sports; Workload; Young Adult
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1055/a-0955-5589
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/44766

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