The Relationship Between Variables in Wearable Microtechnology Devices and Cricket Fast-Bowling Intensity

McNamara, Dean J. and Gabbett, Tim J. and Blanch, Peter and Kelly, Luke (2018) The Relationship Between Variables in Wearable Microtechnology Devices and Cricket Fast-Bowling Intensity. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 13 (2). pp. 135-139. ISSN 1555-0265


Abstract

To date, the monitoring of fast-bowling workloads across training and competition environments has been limited to counting total balls bowled. However, bowling at faster velocities is likely to require greater effort while also placing greater load on the bowler. This study investigated the relationship between prescribed effort and microtechnology outputs in fast bowlers to ascertain whether the technology could provide a more refined measure of workload. Twelve high-performing fast bowlers (mean ± SD age 20.3 ± 2.2 y) participated in the study. Each bowler bowled 6 balls at prescribed bowling intensities of 60%, 70%, 85%, and 100%. The relationships between microtechnology outputs, prescribed intensity, and ball velocity were determined using polynomial regression. Very large relationships were observed between prescribed effort and ball velocity for peak PlayerLoad™ (R = .83 ± .19 and .82 ± .20). The PlayerLoad across lower ranges of prescribed effort exhibited a higher coefficient of variation (CV) (60% = 19.0% [17.0–23.0%]), while the CV at higher ranges of prescribed effort was lower (100% = 7.3% [6.4–8.5%]). Routinely used wearable microtechnology devices offer opportunities to examine workload and intensity in cricket fast bowlers outside the normal metrics reported. They offer a useful tool for prescribing and monitoring bowling intensity and workload in elite fast bowlers.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 07 Dec 2021 02:01
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2021 04:32
Uncontrolled Keywords: Accelerometry; Biomechanical Phenomena; Geographic Information Systems; Humans; Microtechnology; Sports; Young Adult
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0540
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/44513

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