Cricothyrotomy Is Faster Than Tracheostomy for Emergency Front-of-Neck Airway Access in Dogs

Croton, Catriona ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2179-6979 and Hardjo, Sureiyan and Haworth, Mark and Woldeyohannes, Solomon and Purcell, Sarah Leonie (2021) Cricothyrotomy Is Faster Than Tracheostomy for Emergency Front-of-Neck Airway Access in Dogs. Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 7:593687. pp. 1-9.

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Abstract

Objectives: In novice final year veterinary students, we sought to: (1) compare the procedure time between a novel cricothyrotomy (CTT) technique and an abbreviated tracheostomy (TT) technique in canine cadavers, (2) assess the success rate of each procedure, (3) assess the complication rate of each procedure via a damage score, (4) evaluate the technical difficulty of each procedure and (5) determine the preferred procedure of study participants for emergency front-of-neck access. Materials and Methods: A prospective, cross-over, block randomised trial was performed, where veterinary students completed CTT and TT procedures on cadaver dogs. Eight students were recruited and performed 32 procedures on 16 dogs. A generalised estimating equation approach to modelling the procedure times was used. Results: The procedure time was significantly faster for the CTT than the TT technique, on average (p < 0.001). The mean time taken to complete the CTT technique was 49.6 s (95% CI: 29.5–69.6) faster on average, with a mean CTT time of less than half that of the TT. When taking into account the attempt number, the procedure time for a CTT was 66.4 s (95% CI: 38.9–93.9) faster than TT for the first attempt, and for the second attempt, this was 32.7 s (95% CI: 15.2–50.2) faster, on average. The success rate for both procedures was 100% and there was no difference detected in the damage or difficulty scores (P = 0.13 and 0.08, respectively). Seven of eight participants preferred the CTT. Clinical Significance: CTT warrants consideration as the primary option for emergency front-of-neck airway access for dogs.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright © 2021 Hardjo, Croton, Woldeyohannes, Purcell and Haworth. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Sciences (6 Sep 2019 - 31 Dec 2021)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Sciences (6 Sep 2019 - 31 Dec 2021)
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2021 01:25
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2021 04:44
Uncontrolled Keywords: airway obstruction; BACT; CICO; cricothyrotomy; difficult airway; eFONA; intubation; tracheostomy (TT)
Fields of Research (2008): 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0707 Veterinary Sciences > 070711 Veterinary Surgery
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0707 Veterinary Sciences > 070701 Veterinary Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care
Fields of Research (2020): 30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3009 Veterinary sciences > 300912 Veterinary surgery
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3009 Veterinary sciences > 300901 Veterinary anaesthesiology and intensive care
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2020.593687
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/44191

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