Effect of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on an arboreal habitat specialist mammal using GPS telemetry: a case of the red panda

Bista, Damber and Baxter, Greg S. and Hudson, Nicholas J. and Lama, Sonam Tashi and Murray, Peter John ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1143-1706 (2022) Effect of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on an arboreal habitat specialist mammal using GPS telemetry: a case of the red panda. Landscape Ecology, 37 (3). pp. 795-809. ISSN 0921-2973


Abstract

Context: Habitat specialists residing in human-modified landscapes are likely to be more vulnerable to disturbance because of a functional reliance on very particular habitat features. However, there have been few studies designed to specifically address that issue. Objectives: This study aimed to explore how the red panda, an iconic endangered habitat specialist, behaves when faced with disturbances and habitat fragmentation. In particular, we attempted to examine the effect of anthropogenic disturbances and fragmentation on home-range size, activity patterns, and recursion. Methods: Using GPS telemetry we monitored 10 red pandas and documented disturbances using camera trapping for one year in eastern Nepal. We performed spatial analysis, analysed activity patterns and evaluated the effect of habitat fragmentation and disturbances on home-range size and residence time using Linear Mixed Models. Results: Home-range size increased in areas with low availability of forest cover whilst home ranges were smaller in areas with a high road density. Red pandas spent more time in large habitat patches away from roads and cattle stations. Crossing rates suggested that roads acted as a barrier for movement across their habitat. Red pandas also partitioned their activity to minimize interactions with disturbances. Conclusions: Red pandas seem to make a trade-off to co-exist in human-dominated landscapes which may have adverse long-term effects on their survival. This indicates that current patterns of habitat fragmentation and forest exploitation may be adversely affecting red panda conservation efforts and that landscape-scale effects should be considered when planning conservation actions.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agriculture and Environmental Science (1 Jan 2022 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current – Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agriculture and Environmental Science (1 Jan 2022 -)
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2021 06:53
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2022 04:13
Uncontrolled Keywords: home range, habitat fragmentation, barrier effect, activity pattern, residence time, anthropogenic disturbances
Fields of Research (2008): 05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management
05 Environmental Sciences > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050104 Landscape Ecology
Fields of Research (2020): 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3103 Ecology > 310301 Behavioural ecology
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4104 Environmental management > 410402 Environmental assessment and monitoring
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4104 Environmental management > 410407 Wildlife and habitat management
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): D Environment > 96 Environment > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960509 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Mountain and High Country Environments
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960810 Mountain and High Country Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1806 Terrestrial systems and management > 180601 Assessment and management of terrestrial ecosystems
18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1806 Terrestrial systems and management > 180606 Terrestrial biodiversity
18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1806 Terrestrial systems and management > 180603 Evaluation, allocation, and impacts of land use
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-021-01357-w
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43996

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