Air, air, air: a champion midwife programme in Tanzania using HOT neonatal resuscitation - lessons learned

Becker, Jan and Wu, Chiung-Jung (Jo) and Becker, Chase and Moir, James and Gray, Marion and Shimwela, Meshak and Oprescu, Florin (2021) Air, air, air: a champion midwife programme in Tanzania using HOT neonatal resuscitation - lessons learned. Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. pp. 1-6. ISSN 0035-9203

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Abstract

Background: Tanzania has approximately 40 000 newborn deaths per year, with >25% of these linked to intrapartum-related hypoxia. The Helping Babies Breathe© and Golden minute© (HBB©) programme was developed to teach skilled intervention for non-breathing neonates at birth. While Helping Babies Breathe© and Golden minute©, providing training in simulated bag and mask ventilation, is theoretically successful in the classroom, it often fails to transfer to clinical practice without further support. Furthermore, the proclivity of midwives to suction excessively as a first-line intervention is an ingrained behaviour that delays ventilation, contributing to very early neonatal deaths.

Methods: The ‘champion’ programme provided guided instruction during a real-life resuscitation. The site was Amana Hospital, Tanzania. The labour ward conducts 13 500 deliveries annually, most of which are managed by midwives. Brief mannikin simulation practice was held two to three times a week followed by bedside hands-on training (HOT) of bag and mask skills and problem solving while reinforcing the mantra of ‘air, air, air’ as the first-line intervention during a real-life emergency.

Results: Champion midwives (trainers) guided instructions given during a real emergency at the bedside caused learners beliefs to change. Trainees observed changes in baby skin colour and the onset of spontaneous breathing after effective ventilation.

Conclusions: Visible success during an actual real-life emergency created confidence, mastery and collective self-efficacy.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 6 June 2021. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Wellbeing (1 Jan 2015 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Wellbeing (1 Jan 2015 -)
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2021 04:26
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2021 00:15
Uncontrolled Keywords: collective self-efficacy, midwife, neonatal resuscitation, training, transferring clinical skills
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1110 Nursing > 111006 Midwifery
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1110 Nursing > 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4204 Midwifery > 420401 Clinical midwifery
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/trstmh/trab154
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43852

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