UAV based spatiotemporal analysis of the 2019–2020 New South Wales bushfires

Ullah, Fahim ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6221-1175 and Khan, Sara Imran and Munawar, Hafiz Suliman and Qadir, Zakria and Qayyum, Siddra (2021) UAV based spatiotemporal analysis of the 2019–2020 New South Wales bushfires. Sustainability, 13:10207. pp. 1-35.

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Abstract

Bushfires have been a key concern for countries such as Australia for a long time. These must be mitigated to eradicate the associated harmful effects on the climate and to have a sustainable and healthy environment for wildlife. The current study investigates the 2019–2020 bushfires in New South Wales (NSW) Australia. The bush fires are mapped using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing, the hotpots are monitored, and damage is assessed. Further, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)-based bushfire mitigation framework is presented where the bushfires can be mapped and monitored instantly using UAV swarms. For the GIS and remote sensing, datasets of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and VIIRS fire data products are used, whereas the paths of UAVs are optimized using the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. The mapping results of 2019–2020 NSW bushfires show that 50% of the national parks of NSW were impacted by the fires, resulting in damage to 2.5 million hectares of land. The fires are highly clustered towards the north and southeastern cities of NSW and its border region with Victoria. The hotspots are in the Deua, Kosciu Sako, Wollemi, and Yengo National Parks. The current study is the first step towards addressing a key issue of bushfire disasters, in the Australian context, that can be adopted by its Rural Fire Service (RFS), before the next fire season, to instantly map, assess, and subsequently mitigate the bushfire disasters. This will help move towards a smart and sustainable environment.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying (1 Jul 2013 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying (1 Jul 2013 -)
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2021 01:46
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2021 02:02
Uncontrolled Keywords: bushfires; disaster management; spatiotemporal analysis; unmanned aerial vehicles; UAV path planning; geographical information systems; New South Wales Australia
Fields of Research (2008): 12 Built Environment and Design > 1299 Other Built Environment and Design > 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
09 Engineering > 0909 Geomatic Engineering > 090903 Geospatial Information Systems
12 Built Environment and Design > 1205 Urban and Regional Planning > 120505 Regional Analysis and Development
Fields of Research (2020): 33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3399 Other built environment and design > 339999 Other built environment and design not elsewhere classified
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3304 Urban and regional planning > 330406 Regional analysis and development
40 ENGINEERING > 4013 Geomatic engineering > 401302 Geospatial information systems and geospatial data modelling
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810207
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43661

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