Employing Participatory Citizen Science Methods to Promote Age-Friendly Environments Worldwide

King, Abby C. and King, Diane K. and Banchoff, Ann and Solomonov, Smadar and Natan, Ofir Ben and Hua, Jenna and Gardiner, Paul ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8072-2673 and Rosas, Lisa Goldman and Espinosa, Patricia Rodriguez and Winter, Sandra J. and Sheats, Jylana and Salvo, Deborah and Aguilar-Farias, Nicolas and Stathi, Afroditi and Hino, Adriano Akira and Porter, Michelle M. (2020) Employing Participatory Citizen Science Methods to Promote Age-Friendly Environments Worldwide. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (5). pp. 1-30. ISSN 1660-4601

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Abstract

The trajectory of aging is profoundly impacted by the physical and social environmental contexts in which we live. While “top–down” policy activities can have potentially wide impacts on such contexts, they often take time, resources, and political will, and therefore can be less accessible to underserved communities. This article describes a “bottom–up”, resident-engaged method to advance local environmental and policy change, called Our Voice, that can complement policy-level strategies for improving the health, function, and well-being of older adults. Using the World Health Organization’s age-friendly cities global strategy, we describe the Our Voice citizen science program of research that has specifically targeted older adults as environmental change agents to improve their own health and well-being as well as that of their communities. Results from 14 Our Voice studies that have occurred across five continents demonstrate that older adults can learn to use mobile technology to systematically capture and collectively analyze their own data. They can then successfully build consensus around high-priority issues that can be realistically changed and work effectively with local stakeholders to enact meaningful environmental and policy changes that can help to promote healthy aging. The article ends with recommended next steps for growing the resident-engaged citizen science field to advance the health and welfare of all older adults.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 03 Nov 2021 05:52
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2021 02:48
Uncontrolled Keywords: Age-friendly environments; Aging; Built environment; Citizen science; Digital health; Health equity; Health promotion; Older adults; Participatory research; WHO
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110308 Geriatrics and Gerontology
12 Built Environment and Design > 1299 Other Built Environment and Design > 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111712 Health Promotion
Fields of Research (2020): 33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3399 Other built environment and design > 339999 Other built environment and design not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420603 Health promotion
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320210 Geriatrics and gerontology
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051541
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43575

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