Obesity, disability and self-perceived health outcomes in Australian adults: a longitudinal analysis using 14 annual waves of the HILDA cohort

Keramat, Syed Afroz and Alam, Khorshed ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2232-0745 and Ahinkorah, Bright Opoku and Islam, Md Sariful and Islam, Md Irteja and Hossain, Md Zobayer and Ahmed, Sazia and Gow, Jeff and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 (2021) Obesity, disability and self-perceived health outcomes in Australian adults: a longitudinal analysis using 14 annual waves of the HILDA cohort. ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research, 13. pp. 777-788.

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Abstract

Background: Both obesity and disability have been widely recognised as major public health challenges because they play significant roles in determining self-perceived general and mental health. Longitudinal studies of the relationship between obesity and disability with self-reported health outcomes are scarce. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to examine the relationship between obesity and disability with self-perceived general and mental health among Australian adults aged 15 years and above.

Methods: Data were extracted from the most recent 14 waves (waves 6 through 19) of the annual individual person dataset of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey. The longitudinal random-effects logistic regression model was adopted to investigate the relationships between obesity and disability with self-reported health outcomes.

Results: The results revealed that obese individuals and adults with some form of disability are more likely to report poor or fair general and mental health. The odds of self-reporting poor or fair general health were 2.40 and 6.07 times higher among obese (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 2.22– 2.58) and adults with some form of disability (aOR: 6.07, 95% CI: 5.77– 6.39), respectively, relative to adults with healthy weight and those without disability . The results also showed that self-rated poor or fair mental health were 1.22 and 2.40 times higher among obese adults (aOR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.15– 1.30) and adults with disability (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 2.30– 2.51), respectively, compared to their healthy weight peers and peers without disability.

Conclusion: As governmental and non-governmental organisations seek to improve the community’s physical and mental well-being, these organisations need to pay particular attention to routine health care prevention, specific interventions, and treatment practices, especially for obese and/or people with disabilities.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2021 Keramat et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms. php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Business (18 Jan 2021 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2021 01:44
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2021 01:45
Uncontrolled Keywords: Australia, disability, mental health, obesity, self-perceived general health
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111712 Health Promotion
14 Economics > 1402 Applied Economics > 140208 Health Economics
Fields of Research (2020): 38 ECONOMICS > 3801 Applied economics > 380108 Health economics
38 ECONOMICS > 3802 Econometrics > 380204 Panel data analysis
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920403 Disability and Functional Capacity
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
15 ECONOMIC FRAMEWORK > 1505 Microeconomics > 150599 Microeconomics not elsewhere classified
28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280112 Expanding knowledge in the health sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.2147/CEOR.S318094
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43503

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