Trajectories of Change in an Open-access Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Program for Childhood and Adolescent Anxiety: Open Trial

March, Sonja ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8425-7126 and Batterham, Philip J. and Rowe, Arlen ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1880-8513 and Donovan, Caroline and Calear, Alison L. and Spence, Susan H. (2021) Trajectories of Change in an Open-access Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Program for Childhood and Adolescent Anxiety: Open Trial. JMIR Mental Health, 8 (6):e27981. pp. 1-12.

[img]
Preview
Text (Published Version)
March 2021 .pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (364kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Although evidence bolstering the efficacy of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for treating childhood anxiety has been growing continuously, there is scant empirical research investigating the timing of benefits made in iCBT programs (eg, early or delayed). Objective: This study aims to examine the patterns of symptom trajectories (changes in anxiety) across an iCBT program for anxiety (BRAVE Self-Help). Methods: This study’s participants included 10,366 Australian youth aged 7 to 17 years (4140 children aged 7-12 years; 6226 adolescents aged 12-17 years) with elevated anxiety who registered for the BRAVE Self-Help program. Participants self-reported their anxiety symptoms at baseline or session 1 and then at the commencement of each subsequent session. Results: The results show that young people completing the BRAVE Self-Help program tend to fall into two trajectory classes that can be reliably identified in terms of high versus moderate baseline levels of anxiety and subsequent reduction in symptoms. Both high and moderate anxiety severity trajectory classes showed significant reductions in anxiety, with the greatest level of change being achieved within the first six sessions for both classes. However, those in the moderate anxiety severity class tended to show reductions in anxiety symptoms to levels below the elevated range, whereas those in the high symptom group tended to remain in the elevated range despite improvements. Conclusions: These findings suggest that those in the high severity group who do not respond well to iCBT on a self-help basis may benefit from the additional support provided alongside the program or a stepped-care approach where progress is monitored and support can be provided as necessary.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 43477
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling (1 Jan 2015 - 31 Dec 2021)
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2022 06:30
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2022 03:40
Uncontrolled Keywords: Adolescent; Anxiety; Child; ICBT; Online; Trajectories of change
Fields of Research (2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111714 Mental Health
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420302 Digital health
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420313 Mental health services
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5203 Clinical and health psychology > 520302 Clinical psychology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920410 Mental Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2005 Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health) > 200506 Neonatal and child health
20 HEALTH > 2005 Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health) > 200501 Adolescent health
20 HEALTH > 2003 Provision of health and support services > 200305 Mental health services
Funding Details:
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.2196/27981
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43477

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only