The control of respiratory pressures and neuromuscular activation to increase force production in trained martial arts practitioners

Walters, Sherrilyn and Hoffman, Ben ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8408-6192 and MacAskill, William and Johnson, Michael A. and Sharpe, Graham R. and Mills, Dean E. (2021) The control of respiratory pressures and neuromuscular activation to increase force production in trained martial arts practitioners. European Journal of Applied Physiology. ISSN 1439-6319


Abstract

Purpose The mechanisms that explain the ability of trained martial arts practitioners to produce and resist greater forces than untrained individuals to aid combat performance are not fully understood. We investigated whether the greater ability of trained martial arts practitioners to produce and resist forces was associated with an enhanced control of respiratory pres- sures and neuromuscular activation of the respiratory, abdominal, and pelvic floor musculature. Methods Nine trained martial arts practitioners and nine untrained controls were instrumented with skin-surface electromyo- graphy (EMG) on the sternocleidomastoid, rectus abdominis, and the group formed by the transverse abdominal and internal oblique muscles (EMGtra/io). A multipair oesophageal EMG electrode catheter measured gastric (Pg), transdiaphragmatic (Pdi), and oesophageal (Pe) pressures and EMG of the crural diaphragm (EMGdi). Participants performed Standing Isometric Unilateral Chest Press (1) and Standing Posture Control (2) tasks. Results The trained group produced higher forces normalised to body mass2/3 (0.033 ± 0.01 vs. 0.025 ± 0.007 N/kg2/3 mean force in Task 1), lower Pe, and higher Pdi in both tasks. Additionally, they produced higher Pg (73 ± 42 vs. 49 ± 19 cmH2O mean Pg) and EMGtra/io in Task 1 and higher EMGdi in Task 2. The onset of Pg with respect to the onset of force production was earlier, and the relative contributions of Pg/Pe and Pdi/Pe were higher in the trained group in both tasks. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that trained martial arts practitioners utilised a greater contribution of abdominal and diaphragm musculature to chest wall recruitment and higher Pdi to produce and resist higher forces.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 25 August 2021. Permanent restricted access to ArticleFirst version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Wellbeing (1 Jan 2015 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2021 00:18
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2021 00:35
Uncontrolled Keywords: respiratory pressures; respiratory muscles; martial artists; muscular force Abbreviations
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110601 Biomechanics
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420701 Biomechanics
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420702 Exercise physiology
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-021-04800-7
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/43473

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