The relationships of experiencing workplace bullying with mental health, affective commitment, and job satisfaction: application of the job demands control model

Steele, Nicole M. and Rodgers, Bryan and Fogarty, Gerard J. (2020) The relationships of experiencing workplace bullying with mental health, affective commitment, and job satisfaction: application of the job demands control model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (6):2151. pp. 1-14. ISSN 1661-7827

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Abstract

There have been very few theoretical models published to understand the relationship between workplace bullying and different outcome variables. Applying the Job Demands Control (JDC) model, this study analyzed workplace bullying alongside 'traditional' job stressors of role overload and low job control to determine the relative associations of each with mental health and wellbeing. These relative associations have not been well documented. Data were obtained from an organizational climate questionnaire administered to 21 Australian Defence Force units (n = 3193). Results indicated that the correlations between bullying and psychological distress (r = 0.39), job satisfaction (r = -0.28), and affective commitment (r = -0.22) were all significant and for some outcomes greater than those involving the traditional job stressors. Furthermore, for each of these three outcomes, bullying contributed incremental variance after controlling for other job demands. These results support earlier claims that workplace bullying requires the same attention given to traditional work stressors. The JDC model provides a strong theoretical base to investigate workplace bullying. Testing against other stressors allows for consideration of the broader context of workplace bullying when managing the workforce.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling (1 Jan 2015 -)
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2021 23:30
Last Modified: 01 Sep 2021 04:03
Uncontrolled Keywords: bullying; mobbing; psychological distress; commitment; satisfaction; military
Fields of Research (2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Fields of Research (2020): 52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5203 Clinical and health psychology > 520304 Health psychology
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5205 Social and personality psychology > 520503 Personality and individual differences
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5205 Social and personality psychology > 520505 Social psychology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
A Defence > 81 Defence > 8101 Defence > 810109 Personnel
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200409 Mental health
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062151
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42828

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