The fundamental connections between the Solar System and exoplanetary science

Kane, Stephen R. and Arney, Giada N. and Byrne, Paul K. and Dalba, Paul A. and Desch, Steven J. and Horner, Jonti and Izenberg, Noam R. and Mandt, Kathleen E. and Meadows, Victoria S. and Quick, Lynnae C. (2021) The fundamental connections between the Solar System and exoplanetary science. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 126 (2):e2020JE006643. ISSN 2169-9097

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Abstract

Over the past several decades, thousands of planets have been discovered outside our Solar System. These planets exhibit enormous diversity, and their large numbers provide a statistical opportunity to place our Solar System within the broader context of planetary structure, atmospheres, architectures, formation, and evolution. Meanwhile, the field of exoplanetary science is rapidly forging onward toward a goal of atmospheric characterization, inferring surface conditions and interiors, and assessing the potential for habitability. However, the interpretation of exoplanet data requires the development and validation of exoplanet models that depend on in situ data that, in the foreseeable future, are only obtainable from our Solar System. Thus, planetary and exoplanetary science would both greatly benefit from a symbiotic relationship with a two way flow of information. Here, we describe the critical lessons and outstanding questions from planetary science, the study of which are essential for addressing fundamental aspects for a variety of exoplanetary topics. We outline these lessons and questions for the major categories of Solar System bodies, including the terrestrial planets, the giant planets, moons, and minor bodies. We provide a discussion of how many of these planetary science issues may be translated into exoplanet observables that will yield critical insight into current and future exoplanet discoveries.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2021. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2021 01:43
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2021 01:51
Uncontrolled Keywords: exoplanets; Solar System
Fields of Research (2008): 02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020110 Stellar Astronomy and Planetary Systems
02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020108 Planetary Science (excl. Extraterrestrial Geology)
Fields of Research (2020): 51 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 5101 Astronomical sciences > 510107 Planetary science (excl. solar system and planetary geology)
51 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 5101 Astronomical sciences > 510109 Stellar astronomy and planetary systems
51 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 5109 Space sciences > 510905 Solar system planetary science (excl. planetary geology)
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280120 Expanding knowledge in the physical sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JE006643
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42824

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