Why it pays to be nice: the impact of civil and uncivil behaviours on job satisfaction, engagement, psychological strain, and job turnover

Fogarty, Gerard J. and Machin, Tony M. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0967-6934 and Sankey, Kim and Goh, Hong Eng (2013) Why it pays to be nice: the impact of civil and uncivil behaviours on job satisfaction, engagement, psychological strain, and job turnover. In: 10th Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference (IOP 2013), 3-6 July 2013, Perth, Australia.


Abstract

The Queensland Health Systems review conducted in 2005 (Forster, 2005) included several recommendations concerning the elimination of bullying and workplace aggression. Our aim in this paper is to identify antecedents and consequences of negative behaviours in a large health organisation. We were also interested in behaviours that fall at the opposite end of the spectrum, that is, behaviours that show respect for fellow workers. A total of 8,364 QLD Health workers completed an organisational climate survey containing scales measuring stressors, organisational and peer support, respect, harmful behaviours, leadership, job satisfaction, psychological strain, and turnover intentions. Analysis of correlations among these variables showed that harmful behaviours had negative organisational consequences and that measures of respect in the workplace had equally strong positive effects on all outcome measures. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that measures of harmful behaviours explain additional variance in job satisfaction, psychological strain, and turnover intentions when other stressors have already been considered. Simultaneous regression analysis confirmed that measures of both civil and uncivil behaviours make independent contributions to variance in these measures. Organisational initiatives targetting the elimination of negative behaviours should therefore also be accompanied by initiatives that aim to develop a culture where workers feel valued and respected.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology, Counselling and Community (1 Jul 2013 - 31 Dec 2014)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology, Counselling and Community (1 Jul 2013 - 31 Dec 2014)
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2021 05:59
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2021 05:59
Uncontrolled Keywords: civility, harassment, bullying, respect
Fields of Research (2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
Fields of Research (2020): 52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5205 Social and personality psychology > 520503 Personality and individual differences
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5205 Social and personality psychology > 520505 Social psychology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being)
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920410 Mental Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42812

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