Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductors for Biointegrated Electronics: Recent Advances and Future Directions

Nguyen, Nhat-Khuong and Nguyen, Thanh and Nguyen, Tuan-Khoa and Yadav, Sharda and Dinh, Toan ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7489-9640 and Masud, Mostafa Kamal and Singha, Pradip and Do, Thanh Nho and Barton, Matthew J. and Ta, Hang Thu and Kashaninejad, Navid and Ooi, Chin Hong and Nguyen, Nam-Trung and Phan, Hoang-Phuong (2021) Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductors for Biointegrated Electronics: Recent Advances and Future Directions. ACS Applied Electronic Materials, 3 (5). pp. 1959-1981. ISSN 2637-6113


Abstract

Wearable and implantable bioelectronics have experienced remarkable progress over the last decades. Bioelectronic devices provide seamless integration between electronics and biological tissue, offering unique functions for healthcare applications such as real-time and online monitoring and stimulation. Organic semiconductors and silicon-based flexible electronics have been dominantly used as materials for wearable and implantable devices. However, inherent drawbacks such as low electronic mobility, particularly in organic materials, instability, and narrow band gaps mainly limit their full potential for optogenetics and implantable applications. In this context, wide-band-gap (WBG) materials with excellent electrical and mechanical properties have emerged as promising candidates for flexible electronics. With a significant piezoelectric effect, direct band gap and optical transparency, and chemical inertness, these materials are expected to have practical applications in many sectors such as energy harvesting, optoelectronics, or electronic devices, where lasting and stable operation is highly desired. Recent advances in micro/nanomachining processes and synthesis methods for WBG materials led to their possible use in soft electronics. Considering the importance of WBG materials in this fast-growing field, the present paper provides a comprehensive Review on the most common WBG materials, including zinc oxide (ZnO) for II–VI compounds, gallium nitride (GaN) for III–V compounds, and silicon carbide (SiC) for IV–IV compounds. We first discuss the fundamental physical and chemical characteristics of these materials and their advantages for biosensing applications. We then summarize the fabrication techniques of wide-band-gap semiconductors, including how these materials can be transferred from rigid to stretchable and flexible substrates. Next, we provide a snapshot of the recent development of flexible WBG materials-based wearable and implantable devices. Finally, we conclude with perspectives on future research direction.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (1 Jul 2013 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (1 Jul 2013 -)
Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2021 06:05
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2021 00:49
Uncontrolled Keywords: wide-band-gap semiconductors; silicon carbide; zinc oxide; gallium nitride; wearable devices; implantable devices; biointegrated electronics
Fields of Research (2008): 09 Engineering > 0913 Mechanical Engineering > 091306 Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)
Fields of Research (2020): 40 ENGINEERING > 4017 Mechanical engineering > 401705 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280120 Expanding knowledge in the physical sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsaelm.0c01122
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42288

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