Predictors of dieting and non-dieting approaches among adults living in Australia

Leske, Stuart and Strodl, Esben and Hou, Xiang-Yu (2017) Predictors of dieting and non-dieting approaches among adults living in Australia. BMC Public Health, 17. Article number: 214 1-18. ISSN 1471-2458

[img]
Preview
Text (Published Version)
s12889-017-4131-0.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background There is a dearth of research comparing why dieting and non-dieting approaches are adopted. A greater understanding of reasons underlying dieting and non-dieting attempts will help to identify target beliefs for interventions to support and motivate adults to attempt whatever approach they are willing and/or able to pursue. We investigated the predictors of dieting and non-dieting approaches in Australian adults using predictors that were identified in a previous qualitative study. Methods We conducted a prospective study, with two waves of data collection occurring 4 weeks apart. At baseline, participants completed a questionnaire assessing constructs drawn from the theory of planned behaviour (attitude, subjective norm, and self-efficacy), past behaviour, non-planning, attributions for dieting failure, weight control beliefs, and dieting and non-dieting intentions. We used path modelling to analyse responses. Results At baseline, 719 adults (52.2% male) aged between 18 and 76 completed the questionnaire. Four weeks later, 64% of participants (n = 461) reported on their dieting and non-dieting behaviour in the past month. Past behaviour, attitude, subjective norm, and self-identity significantly predicted dieting intentions. Dieting intentions and past behaviour significantly predicted dieting behaviour, while non-planning and self-efficacy did not. The model explained 74.8% of the variance in intention and 52.9% of the variance in behaviour. While most findings were similar for the non-dieting model, subjective norms and self-identity did not predict intention, while self-efficacy and self-identity both predicted non-dieting behaviour directly. The non-dieting model explained 58.2% of the variance in intention and 37.5% of the variance in behaviour. Conclusions The findings from this study provide support for the application of TPB and identity theory constructs in the context of both dieting and non-dieting behaviour. Self-efficacy and self-identity appear more relevant to non-dieting behaviour than dieting behaviour, while subjective norms was more influential in predicting dieting. Practitioners wishing to encourage either approach in their clients should attempt to modify the constructs that influence each approach.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 42233
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2021 01:57
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2021 05:45
Uncontrolled Keywords: Dieting; Identity theory; Locus of control; Non-dieting; Non-planning; Self-efficacy; Self-identity; Theory of planned behaviour; Weight control beliefs
Fields of Research (2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1702 Cognitive Sciences > 170202 Decision Making
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics > 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420201 Behavioural epidemiology
52 PSYCHOLOGY > 5203 Clinical and health psychology > 520302 Clinical psychology
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420605 Preventative health care
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920507 Women's Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920410 Mental Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200409 Mental health
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing)
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4131-0
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42233

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only