Family childcare types and conduct problem behaviors in young children: The mediation role of caregiver-child interaction

Liu, Li and Fan, Lijun and Hou, Xiang-Yu and Wu, Chuan-An and Yin, Xiao-Na and Wen, Guo-Min and Sun, Dengli and Xian, Dan-Xia and Jiang, Hui and Jing, Jin and Jin, Yu and Chen, Wei-Qing (2018) Family childcare types and conduct problem behaviors in young children: The mediation role of caregiver-child interaction. Frontiers in Pediatrics, 6:217. pp. 1-11. ISSN 2296-2360


Abstract

Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the impacts of genetic, family, and community factors on child conduct problems (CPs). However, little is understood regarding the association between family childcare types and child conduct problem behaviors, as well as whether and to what extent caregiver-child interaction mediates the above association.

Methods: 9,289 children first entering kindergartens in the Longhua New District of Shenzhen, China were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Primary caregivers were invited to fulfill a self-administered structured questionnaire containing data regarding socio-demographics, family childcare types, caregiver-child interaction, and child conduct problem behaviors (measured by the Conners' Conduct Problem Subscale). A series of multiple logistic and linear regression models were employed to assess the associations among family childcare, caregiver-child interaction, and child conduct problem behaviors.

Results: Family childcare types other than by parents together (i.e., mother alone, mother with others, grandparents, or changing caregivers) were all significantly associated with higher risks of conduct problem behaviors in young children (adjusted ORs ranged from 2.18 to 2.55, and adjusted βs ranged from 0.043 to 0.073; all p < 0.05), after adjusting for confounders including child age, gender, parental education level, parental age at pregnancy, marital status, and family income. The following family childcare types (mother alone, or grandparents, or changing caregivers) vs. the childcare by parents together showed significant relative indirect effects on conduct problem behaviors through caregiver-child interaction, indicating the significant mediation effect of caregiver-child interaction on the above associations. Mediation of caregiver-child interaction on the effect of being cared by mother with others relative to care by parents together on child conduct problem behaviors was yet non-significant.

Conclusions: Family childcare types other than by parents together are associated with increased risks for conduct problem behaviors in young children. Caregiver-child interaction may function as a potential mediator for the above association.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2021 04:43
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2021 04:43
Uncontrolled Keywords: Caregiver-child interaction; Conduct problem behaviors; Family childcare types; Mediation; Young children
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111704 Community Child Health
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420201 Behavioural epidemiology
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420210 Social epidemiology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920410 Mental Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200409 Mental health
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2018.00217
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42227

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