Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi acted synergistically with Bradyrhizobium sp. to improve nodulation, nitrogen fixation, plant growth and seed yield of mung bean (Vigna radiata) but increased the population density of the root‑lesion nematode Pratylenchus thornei

Gough, Elaine C. and Owen, Kirsty J. and Zwart, Rebecca S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5634-7439 and Thompson, John P. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2097-5695 (2021) Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi acted synergistically with Bradyrhizobium sp. to improve nodulation, nitrogen fixation, plant growth and seed yield of mung bean (Vigna radiata) but increased the population density of the root‑lesion nematode Pratylenchus thornei. Plant and Soil, 465. pp. 431-452. ISSN 0032-079X


Abstract

Purpose
Mung bean is a host of the root-lesion nematode Pratylenchus thornei (Sher & Allen) and the beneficial symbionts arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and nitrogen fixing Bradyrhizobium bacteria. The purpose of this research was to investigate interactions among these organisms affecting their reproduction and functional impact on mung bean nodulation, nutrition, biological nitrogen fixation, growth and seed yield.

Methods
A glasshouse experiment was conducted with mung bean in pots of a pasteurised vertisol using a factorial design of treatments to investigate the interactive effects of AMF, Bradyrhizobium and P. thornei. The plants were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks after sowing for variables of shoot biomass, seed yield, nodulation, P. thornei population density, AMF colonisation of the roots, and nutrients in the plant shoot, including nitrogen isotope natural abundance (δ15N) to quantify fixed nitrogen.

Results
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia acted synergistically to substantially increase nodulation, nitrogen fixation, nutrition, seed yield and biomass of the plants. The population density of P. thornei in roots of the mung bean at 12 weeks increased in plants inoculated with AMF and was positively correlated with plant nutrition namely increased phosphorus, zinc and copper concentrations in the plant shoot.

Conclusion
Understanding these interactions should inform changes in agronomic practices, to promote the synergism between mycorrhiza and rhizobia for mung bean yield, while managing to limit P. thornei population densities to benefit mung bean itself and subsequent crops in the farming system.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 9 June 2021. Permanent restricted access to ArticleFirst version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Crop Health (24 Mar 2014 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Crop Health (24 Mar 2014 -)
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2021 03:05
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2021 02:03
Uncontrolled Keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; Bradyrhizobium; Pratylenchus thornei; microbiota plant interactions; Vigna radiata; synergy
Fields of Research (2008): 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070306 Crop and Pasture Nutrition
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
Fields of Research (2020): 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3108 Plant biology > 310805 Plant pathology
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300409 Crop and pasture protection (incl. pests, diseases and weeds)
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300407 Crop and pasture nutrition
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-021-05007-7
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42191

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