Reducing sitting at work: process evaluation of the SMArT Work (Stand More At Work) intervention

Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and O'Connell, Sophie E. and Davies, Melanie J. and Dunstan, David and Edwardson, Charlotte L. and Esliger, Dale W. and Gray, Laura J. and Yates, Thomas and Munir, Fehmidah (2020) Reducing sitting at work: process evaluation of the SMArT Work (Stand More At Work) intervention. Trials, 21:403. pp. 1-17. ISSN 1745-6215

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Abstract

Background: Office based workers accumulate high amounts of sitting time. SMArT (Stand More AT) Work aimed to reduce occupational sitting time and a cluster randomised controlled trial demonstrated it was successful in achieving this aim. The purpose of this paper is to present the process evaluation of the SMArT Work intervention.

Methods: Questionnaire data were collected from intervention participants at 6 (n=58) and 12 months (n=55). Questionnaires sought feedback on the different components of the intervention (education, height-adjustable desk, Darma cushion, behaviour feedback, progress chats (coaching) with research team, action planning/goal setting diary) and experiences of evaluation measures. Control participants (n=37) were asked via questionnaire about the impact of the study on their behaviour and any lifestyle changes made during the study. Participants from both arms were invited to focus groups to gain a deeper understanding of their experiences upon completion of 12 month follow up.

Results: Focus group and questionnaire data showed a positive attitude towards the height-adjustable workstation with a high proportion of participants using it every day (62%). Most participants (92%) felt the education seminar increased their awareness of the health consequences of too much sitting and motivated them to change their behaviour. Receiving feedback on their sitting time and support from the research team also encouraged behaviour change. The Darma cushion and action planning/goal setting diary were seen to be less helpful for behaviour change. Benefits experienced included fewer aches and pains, improved cognitive functioning, increased productivity, more energy, and positive feelings about general health.

Conclusions: Key elements of the programme identified as facilitating behaviour change were: the educational seminar, the height-adjustable workstation, behavioural feedback and regular contact with research staff through regular progress chats.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2021 23:42
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2021 10:59
Uncontrolled Keywords: Workplace; Behaviour change; Sedentary behaviour; Sit–stand
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-020-04300-7
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42158

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