Physical activity and sedentary behavior research in Indonesian youth: a scoping review

Andriyani, Fitria D. and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Arovah, Novita I. and De Cocker, Katrien (2020) Physical activity and sedentary behavior research in Indonesian youth: a scoping review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (20):7665.

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Abstract

Abstract: Background: This study aimed to map physical activity and sedentary behaviour research trends, designs, and topics for Indonesian youth. Methods: This review conforms to the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR).” A systematic search on eight platforms was performed in August 2018 and was updated in April 2020. Results: From 10,753 documents screened, 166 met the selection criteria. Over half of the studies were cross-sectional, and the majority utilized self-reported measurements (physical activity: 81.1%, sedentary behavior: 88.5%). More than two-thirds of the studies examined physical activity only (67.5%). The top three subtopics reported were prevalence/measurement, correlates, and outcomes of physical activity (28%, 24.6%, and 17%, respectively). The prevalence of “sufficient” physical activity ranges between 12.2% and 52.3%, while the prevalence of sedentary behavior ≥3 hours per day ranges between 24.5% and 33.8%. Conclusions: Future studies need to focus more on intervention and validation, and research needs to be conducted more with nationally representative samples and on youth at the junior high school level. Future studies need to investigate more on psychological, cognitive, affective, social, cultural, and environmental correlates, and in-depth personal views of physical activity and sedentary behavior. More studies using device-based measurements, longitudinal designs, as well as qualitative and mixed-methods approaches are warranted.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2021 06:37
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2021 06:45
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207665
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42153

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