Assessment of muscle-strengthening exercise in public health surveillance for adults: a systematic review

Shakespear-Druery, Jane and De Cocker, Katrien and Biddle, Stuart ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Gavilan-Carrera, Blanca and Segura-Jimenez, Victor and Bennie, Jason ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-8998 (2021) Assessment of muscle-strengthening exercise in public health surveillance for adults: a systematic review. Preventive Medicine, 148:106566. ISSN 0091-7435

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Abstract

There is strong scientific evidence that muscle-strengthening exercise (i.e. use of weight machines, push‐ups, sit-ups) is independently associated with a reduced risk of multiple chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease). However, prevalence rates for meeting the muscle-strengthening exercise guideline (≥2 times/week) are significantly lower (~20%) than those reported to meet the aerobic physical activity guideline (e.g. walking, jogging, cycling) (~50%). It is therefore important to understand public health surveillance approaches to assess muscle-strengthening exercise. The aim of this review was to describe muscle-strengthening exercise assessment in public health surveillance. Informed by the PRISMA guidelines, an extensive keyword search was undertaken across 7 electronic data bases. We identified 86,672 possible articles and following screening (n = 1,140 in full-text) against specific inclusion criteria (adults aged ≥18 years, English, studies containing <1000 participants), extracted data from 156 manuscripts. Fifty-eight different survey systems were identified across 17 countries. Muscle-strengthening exercise frequency (85.3%), duration (23.7%) and intensity (1.3%) were recorded. Muscle-strengthening exercise questions varied significantly, with some (11.5%) requiring a singular ‘yes’ vs ‘no’ response, while others (7.7%) sought specific details (e.g. muscle groups targeted). Assessments of duration and intensity were inconsistent. Very few studies measured the validity (0.6%) and reliability (1.3%) of muscle-strengthening exercise questions. Discrepancy exists within the current assessment systems/surveys used to assess muscle-strengthening exercise in public health surveillance. This is likely to impede efforts to identify at risk groups and trends within physical activity surveillance, and to accurately assess associations between muscle-strengthening exercise and health-related outcomes.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Submitted version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Rural Economies Centre of Excellence (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2021 06:03
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2021 06:03
Uncontrolled Keywords: assessment; measurement; muscle-strengthening exercise; public health surveillance
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106566
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42144

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