Investigating the association between child television viewing and measured child adiposity outcomes in a large nationally representative sample of New Zealanders: a cross-sectional study

Hobbs, Matthew and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Kingsnorth, Andrew P. and Marek, Lukas and Tomintz, Melanie and Wiki, Jesse and McCarthy, John and Campbell, Malcolm and Kingham, Simon (2021) Investigating the association between child television viewing and measured child adiposity outcomes in a large nationally representative sample of New Zealanders: a cross-sectional study. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 18 (5). pp. 524-532. ISSN 1543-3080


Abstract

Background: This study investigates whether parental characteristics moderate the association between child television (TV) viewing and obesity.

Methods: Cross-sectional data from the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) were pooled for the years 2013/14–2016/17 (n=9,022). Parents from adult surveys were related to child data in the child NZHS. Child TV viewing was estimated using self-reported time for each weekday and weekend. Childhood body mass index (BMI) and obesity was defined using the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-off values. Effect modification was assessed by interaction and by stratifying binary logistic regression (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) [95% Confidence Intervals (CI]) analyses by parent education (low, moderate, high) and ethnicity (Asian, European/other, Māori, Pacific).

Results: Watching ≥2 hours TV on average per day in the past week, relative to <2 hours TV viewing, was associated with a higher odds of childhood obesity (AOR=1.26 [1.06, 1.51]). Stratification showed that the association between ≥2 hours TV and obesity was most pronounced for children with parents of European/other parent ethnicity (AOR=1.85 [1.36, 2.52]), and low education (AOR=1.36 [1.01, 1.85]) and high education (AOR=1.50 [1.03, 2.20]).

Conclusion: We found support for a moderating role of parent ethnicity and some evidence of parent education suggesting a more complex relationship exists between child TV viewing and obesity than is sometimes suggested.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2021 Human Kinetics.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2021 00:14
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2021 02:55
Uncontrolled Keywords: public health, New Zealand Health Survey, body size
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420201 Behavioural epidemiology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200411 Overweight and obesity
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2020-0192
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42142

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