Modelling the reallocation of time spent sitting into physical activity: isotemporal substitution vs compositional isotemporal substitution

Biddle, Gregory J. H. and Henson, Joseph and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Davies, Melanie J. and Khunti, Kamlesh and Rowlands, Alex V. and Sutton, Stephen and Yates, Thomas and Edwardson, Charlotte L. (2021) Modelling the reallocation of time spent sitting into physical activity: isotemporal substitution vs compositional isotemporal substitution. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (12):6210. pp. 1-12. ISSN 1661-7827

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Abstract

Isotemporal substitution modelling (ISM) and compositional isotemporal modelling (CISM)are statistical approaches used in epidemiology to model the associations of replacing time in one physical behaviour with time in another. This study’s aim was to use both ISM and CISM to examine and compare associations of reallocating 60 min of sitting into standing or stepping with markers of cardiometabolic health. Cross-sectional data collected during three randomised control trials (RCTs) were utilised. All participants (n = 1554) were identified as being at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reallocating 60 min from sitting to standing and to stepping was associated with a lower BMI, waist circumference, and triglycerides and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol using both ISM and CISM (p < 0.05). The direction and magnitude of significant associations were
consistent across methods. No associations were observed for hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for either method. Results of both ISM and CISM were broadly similar, allowing for the interpretation of previous research, and should enable future research in order to make informed methodological, data-driven decisions.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 4.0/).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2021 23:59
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2021 23:30
Uncontrolled Keywords: sedentary behaviour; physical activity; time use; cardiometabolic health
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2099 Other health > 209999 Other health not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ ijerph18126210
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42137

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