Age-related change in sedentary behavior during childhood and adolescence: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Kontostoli, Elli and Jones, Andy P. and Pearson, Natalie and Foley, Louise and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Atkin, Andrew J. (2021) Age-related change in sedentary behavior during childhood and adolescence: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews, 22 (9):e13263. pp. 1-11. ISSN 1467-7881

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Abstract

Sedentary behaviours are highly prevalent in young people and it is of concern that they may become more prevalent with age. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to quantify age-related change in sedentary behaviour during childhood and adolescence. Ten electronic databases were searched. Included studies presented a quantitative estimate of duration of sedentary behaviours in English language, peer-reviewed publication. Meta-analyses summarised weighted mean differences (WMD) in device-measured sedentary time over 1, 2, 3, and 4+ years of follow-up and annual change in daily sedentary minutes. Effect modification was explored using meta-regression. Narrative synthesis was conducted for questionnaire-assessed sedentary behaviour. Ninety-four studies met inclusion criteria; 30 were eligible for meta-analysis. Sedentary behaviour increased by (WMD 95% Confidence Interval (CI)) 27.9 (23.2, 32.7), 61.0 (50.7, 71.4), 63.7 (53.3, 74.0), 140.7 (105.1, 176.4) minutes per day over 1, 2, 3, 4+ years follow-up. We observed no effect modification by gender, baseline age, location, study attrition or quality. The average annual increase was (ES, 95% CI) 7.8 (6.4, 9.1) minutes. For both individual and composite measures of sedentary behaviour assessed by questionnaire, over half of studies reported increased duration over follow-up. Sedentary behaviour increases as children age and changes consistently in boys and girls.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 3 June 2021. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2021 23:42
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2021 00:34
Uncontrolled Keywords: adolescents, change, children, sedentary behavior, systematic review
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.13263
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42136

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