Trends in the prevalence of adult overweight and obesity in Australia, and its association with geographic remoteness

Keramat, Syed Afroz and Alam, Khorshed ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2232-0745 and Al-Hanawi, Mohammed Khaled and Gow, Jeff and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Hashmi, Rubayyat ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5953-0650 (2021) Trends in the prevalence of adult overweight and obesity in Australia, and its association with geographic remoteness. Scientific Reports, 11:11320. pp. 1-9.

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Abstract

The prevalence of overweight and obesity has been increasing globally and has become a significant public health concern in Australia in the two past decades. This study explores the most recent national prevalence and trends of adult overweight and obesity in Australia. It will also investigate geographic remoteness as a potential risk factor for an individual being overweight or obese in adulthood. A retrospective longitudinal study that utilised 14 successive waves (wave 6 through 19) of a nationally representative linked individual-level survey. Data was obtained from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey. The data on 199,675 observations from 26,713 individuals aged ≥ 15 years over the period 2006 to 2019 was analysed. Random-effects logit model was employed to estimate the association between geographic remoteness and the risk of excessive weight gain. The results reveal that the prevalence of overweight, obesity and combined overweight and obesity among Australian adults in 2019 were 34%, 26% and 60%, respectively. The analysis shows that the prevalence of overweight and obesity varies by geographic remoteness. Adults from regional city urban (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16–2.03) and rural areas (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18–1.47) were more likely to be obese compared with their counterparts from major city urban areas. The results also show that adults living in major city urban areas, regional city urban areas, and regional city rural areas in Australia were 1.53 (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.16–2.03), 1.32 (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18–1.47), and 1.18 (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.08–1.29) times more likely to be overweight compared with their counterparts from major city urban areas in Australia. Substantial geographic variation in the prevalence of overweight and obesity exists among Australian adults and appears to be increasing. Public health measures should focus on contextual obesogenic factors and behavioural characteristics to curb the rising prevalence of adult obesity.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http:// creat iveco mmons. org/ licen ses/ by/4. 0/.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Business (18 Jan 2021 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2021 02:58
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2021 05:54
Uncontrolled Keywords: Australia; geographic remoteness; HILDA; overweight and obesity; prevalence
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111712 Health Promotion
14 Economics > 1402 Applied Economics > 140208 Health Economics
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420309 Health management
38 ECONOMICS > 3801 Applied economics > 380108 Health economics
44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4407 Policy and administration > 440706 Health policy
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420606 Social determinants of health
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200201 Determinants of health
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing)
20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200204 Health inequalities
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-90750-1
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/42121

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