The Impact of Initial Swarm Formation for Tracking of a High Capability Malicious UAV

Brown, Jason and Raj, Nawin (2021) The Impact of Initial Swarm Formation for Tracking of a High Capability Malicious UAV. In: International IOT, Electronics and Mechatronics Conference (IEMTRONICS 2021), 21-24 April 2021, Toronto, Canada.


Abstract

The use of UAVs or drones for criminal or terrorist enterprises is an increasing problem. Many countermeasures have been proposed to prevent, deter, detect and/or mitigate the dangers posed by such malicious UAVs. One such countermeasure is to track or pursue a malicious UAV back to its point of origin using one or more surveillance UAVs in order to apprehend the UAV and possibly its owner. If the malicious UAV has a higher capability set than the surveillance UAVs, it will be able to outrun any one of them, and therefore the tracking responsibility must be distributed over a swarm of surveillance UAVs that are geographically dispersed across the tracking area of interest. One aspect of particular interest is how the initial formation of the swarm of surveillance UAVs impacts its ability to successfully track a malicious UAV. In this paper, we examine a specific circular initial swarm formation comprising uniformly spaced concentric rings of uniformly spaced UAVs. The total number of surveillance UAVs follows the sequence of centred hexagonal numbers as the number of rings increases. The tracking performance of this circular swarm of surveillance UAVs is compared to a reference swarm of the same size in which the initial locations of the UAVs are randomly chosen. Two tracking strategies are considered: 1) Reactive tracking, in which each surveillance UAV acts independently of the others and only pursues the malicious UAV when it itself detects it, and 2) Reactive tracking with predictive pre-positioning, in which once one surveillance UAV detects the malicious UAV, it communicates the estimated trajectory and speed of the malicious UAV to all swarm members so they can predictively move to a more optimum tracking position before the malicious UAV arrives. The results demonstrate that this particular circular swarm of surveillance UAVs has superior tracking performance relative to the reference randomly positioned swarm of the same size; this is true for both tracking strategies, but particularly when predictive prepositioning is employed with a relatively small number of surveillance UAVs.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 41978
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (1 Jul 2013 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Sciences (6 Sep 2019 -)
Date Deposited: 17 May 2021 05:28
Last Modified: 17 May 2021 05:28
Uncontrolled Keywords: UAV, swarm, formation, communication, tracking
Fields of Research (2008): 08 Information and Computing Sciences > 0805 Distributed Computing > 080503 Networking and Communications
09 Engineering > 0913 Mechanical Engineering > 091303 Autonomous Vehicles
09 Engineering > 0913 Mechanical Engineering > 091302 Automation and Control Engineering
10 Technology > 1005 Communications Technologies > 100510 Wireless Communications
Fields of Research (2020): 46 INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES > 4606 Distributed computing and systems software > 460609 Networking and communications
40 ENGINEERING > 4007 Control engineering, mechatronics and robotics > 400702 Automation engineering
40 ENGINEERING > 4007 Control engineering, mechatronics and robotics > 400703 Autonomous vehicle systems
40 ENGINEERING > 4006 Communications engineering > 400608 Wireless communication systems and technologies (incl. microwave and millimetrewave)
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): A Defence > 81 Defence > 8101 Defence > 810107 National Security
B Economic Development > 89 Information and Communication Services > 8901 Communication Networks and Services > 890103 Mobile Data Networks and Services
A Defence > 81 Defence > 8101 Defence > 810104 Emerging Defence Technologies
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 14 DEFENCE > 1401 Defence > 140104 Emerging defence technologies
14 DEFENCE > 1401 Defence > 140109 National security
22 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION SERVICES > 2201 Communication technologies, systems and services > 220107 Wireless technologies, networks and services
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMTRONICS52119.2021.9422506
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41978

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only