Outstanding host resistance will resolve the threat from white leaf spot disease (Pseudocercosporella capsellae) to oilseed and vegetable Brassica spp. crops

Gunasinghe, Niroshini ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8591-0983 and You, Ming Pei and Banga, Surinder S. and Banga, Shashi K. and Barbetti, Martin J. (2017) Outstanding host resistance will resolve the threat from white leaf spot disease (Pseudocercosporella capsellae) to oilseed and vegetable Brassica spp. crops. Australasian Plant Pathology, 46 (2). pp. 137-146. ISSN 0815-3191


Abstract

Field host resistance against the white leaf spot pathogen Pseudocercosporella capsellae was determined across one hundred and seventeen Brassica napus, eleven B. juncea, four B. rapa, five B. oleracea, eight B. fruticulosa and one B. carinata genotypes. Of the one hundred and seventeen B. napus, there were seven lines of B. napus containing weedy crucifer introgression, sixteen lines with B. carinata introgression, fifty six lines of synthetic B. napus from B. juncea into B. carinata and B. rapa into B. oleracea, while remaining B. napus were commercial varieties from Australia. There was wide and significant (P < 0.001) variation across the test genotypes in terms of relative disease development assessed either as % leaves diseased index (%LDI), values ranging from 0 to 68, or % leaves collapsed index (%LCI), with values ranging from 0 to 38. B. rapa subsp. oleifera ATC 95966 Bo was the most resistant genotype to white leaf spot disease (%LDI = 0, %LCI = 0). Very high resistance was observed in all five B. oleracea genotypes (%LDI < 13, %LCI ≤ 10) and of these B. oleracea var. gongylodes Tronchuda with %LDI = 1.0 and %LCI = 2.5 and B. oleracea var. sabellica Kailan with %LDI = 2.4 and %LCI = 2.0 were the most resistant. Eight B. fruticulosa genotypes showed high resistance with %LDI < 15 and ≤ 10 %LCI. While eight out of twelve B. juncea varieties were highly susceptible, there was a range in %LDI of 5–58 and %LCI of 10–30 and with both Montara and VT 535 G showing best resistance of this species. Amongst B. napus genotypes, more than ten of the Australian commercial cultivars demonstrated comparatively higher resistance to white leaf spot disease than the most resistant genotypes with weedy introgression or synthetic B. napus, with commercial cultivars Oscar and Stubby considered to be highly resistant. These resistances offer unique opportunities both for direct deployment where white leaf spot is severe and for oilseed and vegetable Brassica spp. breeding programs to develop commercial cultivars with effective resistance.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2021 05:15
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2021 05:59
Uncontrolled Keywords: Disease screening, Breeding for resistance, Introgression, Brassica juncea, B. carinata, B. oleracea, B. fruticulosa
Fields of Research (2008): 06 Biological Sciences > 0607 Plant Biology > 060704 Plant Pathology
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
06 Biological Sciences > 0605 Microbiology > 060599 Microbiology not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3108 Plant biology > 310805 Plant pathology
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300409 Crop and pasture protection (incl. pests, diseases and weeds)
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3008 Horticultural production > 300804 Horticultural crop protection (incl. pests, diseases and weeds)
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): D Environment > 96 Environment > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960413 Control of Plant Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Environments
B Economic Development > 82 Plant Production and Plant Primary Products > 8202 Horticultural Crops > 820215 Vegetables
B Economic Development > 82 Plant Production and Plant Primary Products > 8205 Winter Grains and Oilseeds > 820502 Canola
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 26 PLANT PRODUCTION AND PLANT PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 2603 Grains and seeds > 260302 Canola
26 PLANT PRODUCTION AND PLANT PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 2605 Horticultural crops > 260512 Protected vegetable crops
26 PLANT PRODUCTION AND PLANT PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 2601 Environmentally sustainable plant production > 260199 Environmentally sustainable plant production not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13313-017-0470-7
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41551

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