Who says waiting is boring? How consumer narratives within online communities help reduce stress while waiting

Hassan, Mahmud and Hassan, Rumman (2020) Who says waiting is boring? How consumer narratives within online communities help reduce stress while waiting. Spanish Journal of Marketing, 24 (3). pp. 403-424. ISSN 2444-9695

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Abstract

Purpose – Waiting is associated with pain and stress that leads to frustration. However, consumer narratives may help cope with the stress associated with such waiting. This study aims to understand consumer waiting behaviours within online communities.

Design/methodology/approach – Data was gathered following a netnographic approach from a Facebook brand community (FBC) by downloading and archiving the threads related to members’ waiting behaviours. This resulted in 91 pages of data, with 438 individual comments and 179 distinct threads.

Findings – The data revealed that members of the sampled FBC exercised waiting behaviour.The authors confirm that waiting for a product is associated with both negative outcomes(frustration, boredom, etc.), but positive ones (create stronger ties with the brand and fellow members, etc.). Members of the FBC exhibited reduced consumer anxiety and stress during the waiting period.

Research limitations/implications – This study found 13 waiting behaviours within the FBC and supports the idea that new value-creating behaviours are noticed within the context of FBCs.

Originality/value – This study focuses on waiting within a goods-based context(waiting to be served has been examined predominantly within the service sector). The study explored the behaviours of consumers who use social media to complain about extended waiting periods to receive the product along with other consumer reactions to these waiting crowds to reduce the emotional pain associated with such delays.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: This article is published under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) licence. Anyone may reproduce, distribute, translate and create derivative works of this article (for both commercial and non-commercial purposes), subject to full attribution to the original publication and authors. The full terms of this licence maybe seen at http://creativecommons.org/licences/by/4.0/legalcode
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Management and Enterprise (1 Jul 2013 - 17 Jan 2021)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Management and Enterprise (1 Jul 2013 - 17 Jan 2021)
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2021 06:28
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2021 22:39
Uncontrolled Keywords: Facebook, online communities, waiting time, consumer narratives, netnographic approach
Fields of Research (2008): 15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services > 1505 Marketing > 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 35 COMMERCE, MANAGEMENT, TOURISM AND SERVICES > 3506 Marketing > 350699 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/SJME-01-2020-0010
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41496

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