A cost and cost-benefit analysis of the Stand More AT Work (SMArT Work) intervention

Munir, Fehmidah and Miller, Paul and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Davies, Melanie J. and Dunstan, David W. and Esliger, Dale W. and Gray, Laura J. and O'Connell, Sophie E. and Waheed, Ghazala and Yates, Thomas and Edwardson, Charlotte L. (2020) A cost and cost-benefit analysis of the Stand More AT Work (SMArT Work) intervention. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (4):1214. pp. 1-9.

[img]
Preview
Text (Published Version)
Munir (2020) SmartWork economic analysis.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (309kB) | Preview

Abstract

This study conducted a cost and cost-benefit analysis of the Stand More AT (SMArT) Work workplace intervention, designed to reduce sitting time. The study was a cluster two-armed randomised controlled trial involving 37 office clusters (146 desk-based workers) in a National Health Service Trust. The intervention group received a height-adjustable workstation with supporting behaviour change strategies. The control group continued with usual practice. Self-report absenteeism, presenteeism and work productivity were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months; and organisational sickness absence records 12 months prior to, and 12 months of the intervention. Mean per employee costs associated with SMArT Work were calculated. Absenteeism, presenteeism and work productivity were estimated, and employer-recorded absence data and employee wage-banding were used to provide a human-capital-based estimate of costs to the organisation. The return-on-investment (ROI) and incremental cost-efficacy ratios (ICER) were calculated. Intervention cost was 692.40 pound per employee. Cost-benefit estimates show a net saving of 1770.32 pound (95%CI -354.40 pound, 3895.04) pound per employee as a result of productivity increase. There were no significant differences in absence data compared to the control group. SMArT Work provides supporting evidence for policy-makers and employers on the cost benefits of reducing sitting time at work.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 41283
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2021 23:54
Last Modified: 26 Feb 2021 05:21
Uncontrolled Keywords: cost-benefit analysis; sitting; standing; sit-stand; presenteeism; sick leave; sickness absence; workplace health promotion
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
14 Economics > 1402 Applied Economics > 140208 Health Economics
Fields of Research (2020): 38 ECONOMICS > 3801 Applied economics > 380108 Health economics
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041214
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41283

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only