Muscle-strengthening exercise among 397,423 U.S. adults: prevalence, correlates, and associations with health conditions

Bennie, Jason A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-8998 and Lee, Duck-chul and Khan, Asaduzzaman and Wiesner, Glen H. and Bauman, Adrian E. and Stamatakis, Emmanuel and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 (2018) Muscle-strengthening exercise among 397,423 U.S. adults: prevalence, correlates, and associations with health conditions. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 55 (6). pp. 864-874. ISSN 0749-3797


Abstract

Introduction: Although muscle-strengthening exercise has multiple independent health benefits, little is known about muscle-strengthening exercise participation and associations with adverse health conditions among U.S. adults.

Methods: In 2017, data were analyzed from the U.S. 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. During telephone surveys, respondents reported how many times during the past week they engaged in muscle-strengthening exercise. Weighted weekly muscle-strengthening exercise frequencies were calculated for the total sample and across sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics. A multivariable logistic regression assessed the odds of having self-reported adverse health conditions (e.g., diabetes, coronary heart disease) according to weekly muscle-strengthening exercise frequency.

Results: Data were available on 397,423 adults (aged 18–80 years). Overall, 30.2% (95% CI=29.9, 30.5) met the muscle-strengthening exercise recommendations (two or more times/week) and 57.8% (95% CI=57.5, 58.2) reported no muscle-strengthening exercise. Older age, insufficient aerobic activity, lower income, lower education, poorer self-rated health, being female, and being overweight/obese were significantly associated with lower odds of meeting the muscle-strengthening exercise recommendations independently of other characteristics. After adjusting for confounders (e.g., age, sex, income, smoking, aerobic activity), when compared with those who did none, muscle-strengthening exercise was associated with lower odds for several adverse health conditions including prevalent diabetes, cancer (non-skin), poor self-rated health, and obesity.

Conclusions: Three in five U.S. adults do not engage in any muscle-strengthening exercise, despite an association for muscle-strengthening exercise with better health conditions. Future muscle-strengthening exercise promotion strategies should target older adults, females, those with low education/income, and those with a poor health status.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to Published version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health, Informatics and Economic Research (1 Aug 2018 - 31 Mar 2020)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health, Informatics and Economic Research (1 Aug 2018 - 31 Mar 2020)
Date Deposited: 17 Feb 2021 05:53
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2021 05:40
Uncontrolled Keywords: strength training; chronic health conditions; diabetes; coronary heart disease
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420201 Behavioural epidemiology
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.022
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41275

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