Muscle-strengthening exercise and prevalent hypertension among 1.5 million adults: a little is better than none

Bennie, Jason A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-8998 and Lee, Duck-chul and Brellenthin, Angelique G. and De Cocker, Katrien (2020) Muscle-strengthening exercise and prevalent hypertension among 1.5 million adults: a little is better than none. Journal of Hypertension, 38 (8). pp. 1466-1473. ISSN 0263-6352


Abstract

Background: Clinical evidence suggests that muscle-strengthening exercise (using weight machines/body weight exercises) may be an important antihypertensive lifestyle therapy. However, epidemiological research on the association between muscle-strengthening exercise and hypertension is limited. We conducted the first population-level study describing the associations between muscle-strengthening exercise and prevalent hypertension among a large sample of US adults.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were pooled from four US health surveillance surveys (2011-2017) (n = 1 539 309, aged >= 18 years). Muscle-strengthening exercise frequency and self-reported clinically diagnosed hypertension (n = 431 313; 28%) were assessed using the same items across each survey. Generalized linear models using Poisson regression with robust error variance were used to calculate the prevalence ratios of hypertension (outcome variable) across muscle-strengthening exercise [exposure variables: 0 (reference); 1 to >= 7 times/week), adjusting for potential cofounders.

Results: Compared with those doing none, the adjusted prevalence ratios for hypertension were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.66-0.68), 0.67 (95% CI: 0.67-0.68), 0.70 (95% CI: 0.69-0.70), 0.61 (95% CI: 0.60-0.63), 0.62 (95% CI: 0.61-0.64), 0.60 (95% CI: 0.58-0.62) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.82-0.84) among the groups engaging in muscle-strengthening exercise one, two, three, four, five, six, and at least seven times/week, respectively. Associations remained after stratification for sociodemographic factors (age, sex), lifestyle characteristics (aerobic exercise, BMI, self-rated health, smoking, alcohol) and comorbidities (e.g. arthritis, diabetes, depression).

Conclusion: Among over 1.5 million adults, compared with those doing none, any weekly frequency in muscle-strengthening exercise was associated with a lower prevalence of hypertension. Longitudinal studies and large-scale muscle-strengthening exercise interventions with population representative samples are needed to confirm these preliminary cross-sectional observations.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright © 2020 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2021 04:37
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2021 01:30
Uncontrolled Keywords: blood pressure; epidemiology; resistance exercise
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420201 Behavioural epidemiology
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1097/hjh.0000000000002415
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41267

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