Factors associated with adherence to the muscle-strengthening activity guideline among adolescents

Smith, Jordan J. and Diallo, Thierno M. O. and Bennie, Jason A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-8998 and Tomkinson, Grant R. and Lubans, David R. (2020) Factors associated with adherence to the muscle-strengthening activity guideline among adolescents. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 51:101747. pp. 1-8. ISSN 1469-0292


Abstract

Purpose
We aimed to explore associations between guideline-concordant muscle-strengthening activity (MSA) and demographic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral factors among Australian adolescents.

Methods
We used baseline data from the ‘Resistance Training for Teens’ cluster randomized controlled trial (collected April–June 2015). Adolescents (n = 602, mean age = 14.1 ± 0.5 years, 50% female) from 16 schools in New South Wales, Australia self-reported their sex, primary language spoken at home, postal code (for socioeconomic status), resistance training (RT) self-efficacy, motivation for RT, perceived strength, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), screen-time, and sleep. Participants also completed tests of height, weight, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, flexibility, and RT skills. MSA was self-reported and participants were dichotomized as ‘meeting’ (3–7 days) or ‘not meeting’ (0–2 days) the MSA guideline. Binary logistic regression with odds ratios (OR) was used to determine associations with adolescents' MSA.

Results
Analyses for each variable group explained a small-to-moderate proportion of the variance in MSA. Sex, muscular fitness, RT self-efficacy, perceived strength, and total MVPA emerged as statistically significant factors. However, only RT self-efficacy (OR = 2.48 [1.37 to 4.50]) and total MVPA (OR = 1.48 [1.22 to 1.79]) were associated with guideline-concordant MSA in the full model, which explained 52% of the variance.

Conclusions
Our study adds to the limited understanding of adolescents' MSA behavior. RT self-efficacy and total MVPA were independently associated with guideline-concordant MSA among Australian adolescents. The findings have implications for the design and delivery of future interventions targeting adolescents’ MSA behavior.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2021 04:51
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 04:09
Uncontrolled Keywords: Resistance training, Youth, Exercise, Fitness, Strength, Correlates
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420201 Behavioural epidemiology
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2020.101747
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41261

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