Australia: A Continent Without Native Powdery Mildews? The First Comprehensive Catalog Indicates Recent Introductions and Multiple Host Range Expansion Events, and Leads to the Re-discovery of Salmonomyces as a New Lineage of the Erysiphales

Kiss, Levente and Vaghefi, Niloofar and Bransgrove, Kaylene and Dearnaley, John D. W. and Takamatsu, Susumu and Tan, Yu Pei and Marston, Craig and Liu, Shu-Yan and Jin, Dan-Ni and Adorada, Dante L. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5290-1781 and Bailey, Jordan and Cabrera de Alvarez, Maria Graciela and Daly, Andrew and Dirchwolf, Pamela Maia and Jones, Lynne and Nguyen, Thuan Dat and Edwards, Jacqueline and Ho, Wellcome and Kelly, Lisa and Mintoff, Sharl J. L. and Morrison, Jennifer and Nemeth, Mark Z. and Perkins, Sandy and Shivas, Roger G. and Smith, Reannon and Stuart, Kara and Southwell, Ronald and Turaganivalu, Unaisi and Vaczy, Kalman Zoltan and Blommestein, Annie Van and Wright, Dominie and Young, Anthony and Braun, Uwe (2020) Australia: A Continent Without Native Powdery Mildews? The First Comprehensive Catalog Indicates Recent Introductions and Multiple Host Range Expansion Events, and Leads to the Re-discovery of Salmonomyces as a New Lineage of the Erysiphales. Frontiers in Microbiology, 11:1571. pp. 1-31. ISSN 1664-302X

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Abstract

In contrast to Eurasia and North America, powdery mildews (Ascomycota, Erysiphales) are understudied in Australia. There are over 900 species known globally, with fewer than currently 60 recorded from Australia. Some of the Australian records are doubtful as the identifications were presumptive, being based on host plant-pathogen lists from overseas. The goal of this study was to provide the first comprehensive catalog of all powdery mildew species present in Australia. The project resulted in (i) an up-to-date list of all the taxa that have been identified in Australia based on published DNA barcode sequences prior to this study; (ii) the precise identification of 117 specimens freshly collected from across the country; and (iii) the precise identification of 30 herbarium specimens collected between 1975 and 2013. This study confirmed 42 species representing 10 genera, including two genera and 13 species recorded for the first time in Australia. In Eurasia and North America, the number of powdery mildew species is much higher. Phylogenetic analyses of powdery mildews collected from Acalypha spp. resulted in the transfer of Erysiphe acalyphae to Salmonomyces, a resurrected genus. Salmonomyces acalyphae comb. nov. represents a newly discovered lineage of the Erysiphales. Another taxonomic change is the transfer of Oidium ixodiae to Golovinomyces. Powdery mildew infections have been confirmed on 13 native Australian plant species in the genera Acacia, Acalypha, Cephalotus, Convolvulus, Eucalyptus, Hardenbergia, Ixodia, Jagera, Senecio, and Trema. Most of the causal agents were polyphagous species that infect many other host plants both overseas and in Australia. All powdery mildews infecting native plants in Australia were phylogenetically closely related to species known overseas. The data indicate that Australia is a continent without native powdery mildews, and most, if not all, species have been introduced since the European colonization of the continent.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Research and Innovation Division (12 Jul 2012 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Crop Health (24 Mar 2014 -)
Date Deposited: 17 Feb 2021 00:13
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2021 01:33
Uncontrolled Keywords: host jumps, host-pathogen interactions, invasive species, obligate biotrophs, plant-microbe interactions, rapid evolution
Fields of Research (2008): 06 Biological Sciences > 0605 Microbiology > 060505 Mycology
Fields of Research (2020): 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3107 Microbiology > 310705 Mycology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280102 Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences
Funding Details:
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01571
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41252

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