An Exploratory Study of the Readiness of Public Healthcare Facilities in Developing Countries to Adopt Health Information Technology (HIT)/e-Health: the Case of Ghana

Yusif, Salifu and Hafeez-Baig, Abdul and Soar, Jeffrey ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4964-7556 (2020) An Exploratory Study of the Readiness of Public Healthcare Facilities in Developing Countries to Adopt Health Information Technology (HIT)/e-Health: the Case of Ghana. Journal of Healthcare Informatics Research, 4 (2). pp. 189-214. ISSN 2509-4971


Abstract

There are myriad of factors used in assessing health information technology (HIT)/e-Health of healthcare institutions in developing countries and beyond. In this paper, we intended to identify and gain a deeper understanding of factors used in assessing HIT/e-Health readiness in developing countries through the identification of contextual attributes using Ghana as an exemplary developing country. Through in-depth interviews using aide memoire as interview guide, we explored Core readiness, Engagement readiness, Technological readiness, HIT funding readiness, Regulatory and policy readiness, Workforce readiness and Change Management readiness. We adapted the systematic thematic analysis of qualitative data guide suggested by Braun and Clarke (2013) and O’Connor and Gibson (Pimatisiwin 1: 63–90, 2003) in order to generate codes and build over-arching themes. While Organizational cultural readiness was found to be a more applicable theme/factor in place of Engagement readiness and Change management readiness, Resource readiness wasalso deemed a more appropriate theme for HIT funding readiness and Workforce readiness respectively. A total of 23 factors likely to promote HIT adoption in Ghana and 29 factors capable of impeding HIT adoption in Ghana and potentially in other developing countries were identified. For effective assessment of HIT readiness factors, there is a critical need for a deeper understanding of their applicability in differing settings. The outcome of this study offers a valuable insight into improving circumstances under which HIT/e-Health is adopted. When effectually carried out, assessment of this nature could be help side-step losses on large money, effort, time, delay and importantly, dissatisfaction among stakeholders while enabling change processes healthcare institutions and communities involved. This study also contributes to the limited literature on HIT/e-Health implementation scenarios while offering basis for theory-building.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Management and Enterprise (1 Jul 2013 - 17 Jan 2021)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Management and Enterprise (1 Jul 2013 - 17 Jan 2021)
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2021 04:46
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2021 05:42
Uncontrolled Keywords: Health Information Technology, HIC, e-Health, Public Healthcare
Fields of Research (2008): 08 Information and Computing Sciences > 0806 Information Systems > 080609 Information Systems Management
Fields of Research (2020): 46 INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES > 4609 Information systems > 460912 Knowledge and information management
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 22 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION SERVICES > 2204 Information systems, technologies and services > 220408 Information systems
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s41666-020-00070-8
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/41125

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