Growing-season soil microbial respiration response to long-term no tillage and spring ridge tillage

Wang, Gang and Jia, Honglei and Zhuang, Jian and Glatzel, Stephan and Bennett, John McL. and Zhu, Yingcan (2020) Growing-season soil microbial respiration response to long-term no tillage and spring ridge tillage. International Journal of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 13 (4). pp. 143-150. ISSN 1934-6344

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Abstract

No tillage (NT) and spring ridge tillage (SRT) are two common applications of conservation tillage. Although conservation tillage is known to exert major control over soil microbial respiration (SMR), the growing-season SMR response to these two applications remains elusive. In order to better understand the influence of conservation tillage practices, this experiment was conducted in an experimental field using NT and SRT for 17 years. In situ measurements of SMR, soil temperature and soil water content (SWC) were performed. Soil samples were collected to analyze soil porosity, soil microbial biomass (SMB) and soil enzymatic activities. Results show that the two conservation tillage systems had a significant difference (p<0.05) in terms of SMR; the SMR of NT was 14.7 mg∙C/m2∙h higher than that of SRT. In terms of soil temperature and soil enzymatic activities, the two treatments were not significantly different (p>0.05). Despite SRT increasing the proportion of micro-porosities and meso-porosities, the soil macro-porosities for NT were 7.37% higher than that of SRT, which resulted in higher bacteria and fungi in NT. Owing to SRT damaged the hypha, which had disadvantage in soil microbe protection. Inversely, less soil disturbance was a unique advantage in NT, which was in favor of improving soil macro-pores and SWC. Redundancy analyses (RDA) showed SMR was positively correlated with soil macro-pores, SMB and SWC. Furthermore, the Pearson correlation test indicated that SMB and soil enzymatic activities did not have a significant correlation (p>0.05). This study results suggest that SRT is more conducive to carbon sequestration compared with NT in cropland.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2021 22:19
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2021 05:24
Uncontrolled Keywords: no tillage, spring ridge tillage, soil microbial respiration, microbial biomass, soil porosity, soil enzymatic activity
Fields of Research (2008): 05 Environmental Sciences > 0503 Soil Sciences > 050305 Soil Physics
05 Environmental Sciences > 0503 Soil Sciences > 050303 Soil Biology
05 Environmental Sciences > 0503 Soil Sciences > 050302 Land Capability and Soil Degradation
Fields of Research (2020): 41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4106 Soil sciences > 410604 Soil chemistry and soil carbon sequestration (excl. carbon sequestration science)
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4106 Soil sciences > 410605 Soil physics
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4106 Soil sciences > 410603 Soil biology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): D Environment > 96 Environment > 9614 Soils > 961402 Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Soils
Socio-Economic Objectives (2020): 18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1806 Terrestrial systems and management > 180605 Soils
Identification Number or DOI: doi:10.25165/j.ijabe.20201304.5587
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/40537

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