Nanoarchitectonics for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Nanowires: Toward the Next Generation of Nanoelectromechanical Systems for Environmental Monitoring

Pham, Tuan-Anh and Qamar, Afzaal and Dinh, Toan ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7489-9640 and Masud, Mostafa Kamal and Rais-Zadeh, Mina and Senesky, Debbie G. and Yamauchi, Yusuke and Nguyen, Nam‐Trung and Phan, Hoang‐Phuong (2020) Nanoarchitectonics for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Nanowires: Toward the Next Generation of Nanoelectromechanical Systems for Environmental Monitoring. Advanced Science:2001294. pp. 1-30.

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Abstract

Semiconductor nanowires are widely considered as the building blocks that revolutionized many areas of nanosciences and nanotechnologies. The unique features in nanowires, including high electron transport, excellent mechanical robustness, large surface area, and capability to engineer their intrinsic properties, enable new classes of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors in the form of nanowires are a hot spot of research owing to the tremendous possibilities in NEMS, particularly for environmental monitoring and energy harvesting. This article presents a comprehensive overview of the recent progress on the growth, properties and applications of silicon carbide (SiC), group III‐nitrides, and diamond nanowires as the materials of choice for NEMS. It begins with a snapshot on material developments and fabrication technologies, covering both bottom‐up and top‐down approaches. A discussion on the mechanical, electrical, optical, and thermal properties is provided detailing the fundamental physics of WBG nanowires along with their potential for NEMS. A series of sensing and electronic devices particularly for environmental monitoring is reviewed, which further extend the capability in industrial applications. The article concludes with the merits and shortcomings of environmental monitoring applications based on these classes of nanowires, providing a roadmap for future development in this fast‐emerging research field.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (1 Jul 2013 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (1 Jul 2013 -)
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2020 03:34
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2020 05:53
Uncontrolled Keywords: environmental monitoring; nanoarchitectonics; nanofabrication; nanosensors; semiconductor nanowires
Fields of Research (2008): 09 Engineering > 0913 Mechanical Engineering > 091306 Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/advs.202001294
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/39826

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