Solar System Physics for Exoplanet Research

Horner, J. and Kane, S. R. and Marshall, J. P. and Dalba, P. A. and Holt, T. R. and Wood, J. and Maynard-Casely, H. E. and Wittenmyer, R. and Lykawka, P. S. and Hill, M. and Salmeron, R. and Bailey, J. and Lohne, T. and Agnew, M. and Carter, B. D. and Tylor, C. C. E. (2020) Solar System Physics for Exoplanet Research. Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 132 (1016):102001. pp. 1-115. ISSN 0004-6280


Abstract

Over the past three decades, we have witnessed one of the great revolutions in our understanding of the cosmos — the dawn of the Exoplanet Era. Where once we knew of just one planetary system (the solar system), we now know of thousands, with new systems being announced on a weekly basis. Of the thousands of planetary systems we have found to date, however, there is only one that we can study up-close and personal—the solar system. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the solar system for the exoplanetary science community — with a focus on the processes thought to have shaped the system we see today. In section one, we introduce the solar system as a single well studied example of the many planetary systems now observed. In section two, we describe the solar systemʼs small body populations as we know them today—from the two hundred and five known planetary satellites to the various populations of small bodies that serve as a reminder of the systemʼs formation and early evolution. In section three, we consider our current knowledge of the solar systemʼs planets, as physical bodies. In section four we discuss the research that has been carried out into the solar systemʼs formation and evolution, with a focus on the information gleaned as a result of detailed studies of the systemʼs small body populations. In section five, we discuss our current knowledge of planetary systems beyond our own — both in terms of the planets they host, and in terms of the debris that we observe orbiting their host stars. As we learn ever more about the diversity and ubiquity of other planetary systems, our solar system will remain the key touchstone that facilitates our understanding and modeling of those newly found systems, and we finish section five with a discussion of the future surveys that will further expand that knowledge.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2020 05:48
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2020 03:17
Uncontrolled Keywords: Solar system astronomy; Solar system formation; Solar system planets; Small solar system bodies; Exoplanets; Planetary science
Fields of Research (2008): 02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020110 Stellar Astronomy and Planetary Systems
02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020108 Planetary Science (excl. Extraterrestrial Geology)
02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020101 Astrobiology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1538-3873/ab8eb9
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/39499

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